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Faculty: Mark Mulder

Mark MulderMark Mulder, Associate Professor, Sociology

616-526-6755
mmulder@calvin.edu
Office: Spoelhof Center 229

Weekly Schedule
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Educational Background

  • BA Trinity Christian College
  • MA University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • PhD University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Teaching Interests

Diversity and inequality in the United States, urban sociology, sociology internship seminar, qualitative methods

Research Interests

Urban studies, faith-based homeless shelters, intentional communities, the concept of “place”

Selected Publications

Book Cover

Shades of White Flight: Evangelical Congregations and Urban Departure, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (Forthcoming 2015).

"Worshipping to Stay the Same: Avoiding the Local to Maintain Solidarity," in Christians and the Color Line: Race and Religion After Divided by Faith, J. Russel Hawkins and Phillip Luke Sintiere, eds. New York: Oxford University Press (2014).

“The Role of the Congregation in Community Service: A Philanthropic Case Study” (with Kristen Napp, Zig Ingraffia, Neil Carlson, Khary Bridgewater, and Edwin Hernandez). The Foundation Review, Fall 2012.

“Evangelical Church Polity and the Nuances of White Flight: A Case Study from the Roseland and Englewood Neighborhoods in Chicago. Journal of Urban History, January 2012.

“Understanding Religion Takes Practice: Anti-Urban Bias, Geographical Habits, and Theological Influences,”(with James K.A. Smith) in Ecclesiology and Ethnography, Christian Scharen, ed. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdman’s Publising Co. (2012)

"Congregational Responses to Growing Urban Diversity in a White Ethnic Denomination." Social Problems 56: 335-356. 2009. (with Kevin Dougherty)

"Urban Growth, Community, and the Environment: An Experiential Pedagogy." Cities and the Environment. 1(1). 2008. (with Don De Graaf)

"Mobility and the (In)Significance of Place in an Evangelical Church: A Case Study from the South Side of Chicago." Geographies of Religions and Belief Systems 3 (1): 16-43. 2009.