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Further postings below, but first, an introduction to RSS -- with special attention paid to Google Reader:



Do you know about and use "RSS"?
Google Reader is a great tool for YOUR targeted acqusition of knowledge!

Here is a clip about RSS in general. Check it out!

You NEED to know about this.

 

NOTE: I use RSS feeds extensively to acquire knowledge from all over the world.
However, I apologize for not implementing an RSS feed on this site.
Plans are forthcoming for a change in communication vehicles/channels; so until then,
I will hold off on implementing an RSS feed on this site.

Also see:

HOW TO: Use Google Reader Like A Rockstar from Mashable
Shortcut Keys for Google Reader -- from gTricks.com
NOTE: READ THIS FOR BEST PRACTICES SAKE
WebTools4Educators- About RSS -- from the Webcast Academy
RSSTop55: Best Blog Directory And RSS Submission Sites -- from Robin Good's site
100 Cool Things You Can Do With RSS -- from Accredited Degrees
Subliminal pattern recognition and RSS readers -- from Tarina blog
Wrangling your RSS feeds -- from Amy Sample

Linear, intentional learning was how you learned in the past. Enter nonlinear, visually active way of learning of the future. The blogosphere is like a digital photograph: one pixel is one blog post. The details don’t make any sense but once the pixels appear to be connected, it forms a pattern, a picture perhaps that you can recognize. This is exactly what happens if you swim in information overload and try to perceive how things fit together. As a result, you might think that you have almost psychic capabilities to know what is happening at the market right now and how to respond. If you are an individual, start using RSS readers and expand your field of subliminal vision. Use sources that regularly provide insight into your life. If you are a corporation, create information overload inside your organization and give people tools to follow and perceive patterns. Otherwise your competitors will soon know better than you what to do next.

Get RSS Feed Suggestions Based on your Existing Subscriptions -- from Digital Insipiration, by Amit Agarwal
If you are looking to expand your blog reading list but don’t have time to hunt the web for identifying other great blogs that you are not subscribed to, try Suggest RSS.

SuggestRSS


Following information from Travis LaFleur - T&L Team at Calvin College

All of the major browsers support subscribing to RSS feeds:

  • Firefox calls them "Live Bookmarks" and lets you put them either in your bookmarks menu or bookmarks toolbar. From what I can tell, you aren't notified when something new is posted, so it's up to you to check.
  • Internet Explorer puts them under the Favorites sidebar in a section called "Feeds". It lists all your subscriptions and highlights in bold the ones with new posts. It's a little tricky to get to, but once you're there it works pretty well.
  • Safari acts pretty much like Firefox, but it displays how many unread posts there are for any given feed. So if you add The Hoot to your bookmarks bar and there are 3 new entries, it will display "The Hoot (3)".
  • For reference, here are a few links that talk about RSS in the big three browsers:

NOTE: The newbie on the block-- Google Chrome -- currently has no support for RSS feeds. It just displays the XML file as plain text.

 


11/16/09

[Really Simple Syndication] RSS – Day 1 – An Introduction -- from Engaged Learning


10/16/09

Beyond RSS – Four sites that can tell you what you want to read -- from Royal Pingdom by Thursday Bram

Related item from:
10 secrets to staying informed about web design -- from Boagworld web design podcast by Paul Boag
Whether you are a designer, developer or website owner there is an immense pressure to keep up with the latest web innovations. With the web moving so fast what is best practice one day is out of date the next. Worse still, we are so busy building and running websites, that we rarely have the time to keep informed. However, it is not impossible and the answer lies in the clever use of RSS. Below are 10 secrets I have discovered that allow me to get a broad overview of the industry without wasting hours of my time everyday.

1. Get a great RSS reader
It goes without saying, but the first thing you need is a great RSS reader. The key thing you are looking for, is a reader that allows you to identify which content is most likely to be of interest to you. There are two ways this can be achieved.

One approach is to use folders. This is the approach I take. I use Google reader and organise the different feeds into folders that help me prioritise. I talk more about how I organise things below.

The second approach is to use an RSS reader that does this prioritisation for you. One example of this kind of reader is Fever. Fever reads your feeds and picks out the most frequently talked about links. What is great about this approach is the more feeds you add, the better fever gets at identifying important content.

Whatever approach you use, you must be able to quickly identify important stories and avoid feeling swamped by posts.

2. Organise your feeds
If you choose a more traditional feed reader such as Google Reader it is important to organise your feeds well. If you don’t then great content can get lost among high frequency feeds such as Techcrunch. Everybody will organise their feeds in a slightly different way and I myself have tried several approaches. However, the one that seems to be working best for me is to have the following folders:

  • Must Read – This is where I place feeds that consistently produce great content and I cannot afford to miss a post.
  • Quantity Feeds – These are feeds from sites that post regularly. Sites like the BBC may produce great content, but there is so much of it that it can overwhelm other feeds. By isolating them I can ensure I don’t miss anything important.
  • Links – I subscribe to several feeds that are just collections of links from people I respect (I will talk about this more later). Because these contain no actual content in themselves, I keep them separate for a time when I can hunt through the list for any gems.
  • The rest – These are less valuable, low volume feeds that I read when additional time is available.

Of course just because this approach works for me does not mean it will for you. You need to find the best folder structure that suits the content you subscribe to.


9/29/09

From DSC and ISTE.org...some books that you might be interested in:

Student Powered PodcastingStudent-Powered Podcasting: Teaching for 21st-Century Literacy -- by Christopher Shamburg
Podcasting—it's a great way to teach 21st-century literacies, it's a catalyst for engaging students as active participants in culture and society, and it's a tool for teaching powerful ideas. When students podcast, they connect the outside world with what they’re learning in the classroom and discover how to responsibly use content created by others, all while gaining technology skills that will last a lifetime. 

Student-Powered Podcasting shows you why and how to incorporate student-generated podcasting into your curriculum. The book includes tutorials for GarageBand and Audacity, 17 adaptable units, assessment rubrics, and plenty of examples. In addition, author Christopher Shamburg discusses copyright issues and shows you how students can effectively and ethically use materials that others have produced. Get the resources and information you need to help students create useful, educational podcasts, and make sure your students have the 21st-century literacy skills they need to succeed—in school and beyond. Learn more about this book and topic: listen to an interview with author Christopher Shamburg on ISTE Casts. Also see: www.iste.org

RSS for Educators: Blogs, Newsfeeds, Podcasts, and Wikis in the Classroom 
Harness the power of RSS for classroom projects, professional development, keeping students and parents informed, and more.

Educator's Podcast Guide
A complete introduction to great educational podcasts, including hardware and software needs, integrating podcasts into your curriculum, and managing podcasts in the classroom


5/20/09

Google Reader Tells You Which Friends Are Worth Following -- from Mashable! by Ben Parr

Google Reader LogoGoogle Reader has been adding more and more social features recently, like the commenting on shared items options they added back in March. Today, they announced some updates that continue this push with several new social features.

 

4/15/09

Wikis, Blogs, and RSS Presentation -- by Travis LaFleur

Today's LunchByte was about wikis, blogs, and RSS feeds. We discussed blogs and wikis within the general "Web 2.0" context and also how they can be used in the classroom. Then we explored RSS feeds and how they can be used to stay up-to-date with your favorite sites. If you're interested, here's a link to the slides from my presentation.


2/25/09

More Efficient RSS Reading -- from WebWorkerDaily by Dawn Foster, by Dawn Foster
In my recent post about using Harvest to track my time, I discovered that I was spending too much of my time consuming information. As a result, I’ve been working on ways to further increase my efficiency, starting with some Twitter efficiency improvements, and I thought that a post about becoming more efficient at consuming blogs and other news content via RSS would be a good next step.

I love information and wish I could spend more time reading and consuming it, to learn more about a variety of topics. However, the harsh reality is that there are only so many hours in the day that I can spend reading and learning. I could take the easy way out and just read less, but my goal is to become more efficient at finding the content that I want to read the most.

Pruning your feeds is a good way to start. Fellow WWD blogger Celine Roque wrote a great article about how to fine-tune your RSS subscriptions...


2/18/09

Screencast: How to use RSS and Google Reader for journalism -- from Beatblogging.org


12/3/08

Wrangling your RSS feeds -- from Amy Sample


11/11/08

Subliminal pattern recognition and RSS readers -- from Tarina blog
Linear, intentional learning was how you learned in the past. Enter nonlinear, visually active way of learning of the future. The blogosphere is like a digital photograph: one pixel is one blog post. The details don’t make any sense but once the pixels appear to be connected, it forms a pattern, a picture perhaps that you can recognize. This is exactly what happens if you swim in information overload and try to perceive how things fit together. As a result, you might think that you have almost psychic capabilities to know what is happening at the market right now and how to respond. If you are an individual, start using RSS readers and expand your field of subliminal vision. Use sources that regularly provide insight into your life. If you are a corporation, create information overload inside your organization and give people tools to follow and perceive patterns. Otherwise your competitors will soon know better than you what to do next.

11/10/08

Day 9: Burn Baby Burn! Your Feed, That Is -- from Education and Technology, by Steve Dembo
From DSC: This posting has some good resources/thoughts re: RSS feeds.

8/21/08

From Jay Cross:
Flow of Information -- talks about RSS feeds and what they are, why they are helpful


7/3/08

MERLOT's RSS Feeds -- from MERLOT.org
Quickly "pull" information using MERLOT's RSS feeds re: the following areas/disciplines:

Biology
Business
Chemistry
Criminal Justice
Engineering
Faculty Development
Health Sciences
History
Information Technology
Library and Information Services

Mathematics
Music
Physics
Psychology
Statistics
Teacher Education
World Languages
Fire Safety
Professional Coaching
Technical Allied Health

 
MERLOT

11/29/07

Example of the new language that's forming - i.e. multimedia-based -- from CommonCraft.com

Example of the new language that's forming...