Usage of academic, courtesy and other titles

courtesy titles

Do not use courtesy titles in Calvin publications except for those used for formal events. Abbreviate the courtesy titles Mr.Mrs.Ms. and the formal title Dr. when used with a name. Do not use Mr.Mrs.Ms.and Dr. in combination with any other title or with abbreviations of academic degrees.

  • INCORRECT: Ms. Heavenly Day, PhD, is the projected 2012 professor of the year.
  • CORRECT: Ms. Heavenly Day is the projected 2012 professor of the year.
    • OR: Heavenly Day, PhD, is the projected 2012 professor of the year.

doctor/PhD/JD

Use the title Dr. when referring to a doctor of medicine, veterinary medicine or dentistry. Do not use it to designate a doctor of philosophy—the holder of a PhD—or the holder of a juris doctorate (JD).

  • INCORRECT: Dr. Shady Malpractice attended the lecture on medical ethics by Dr. Ernst Ruminative, a professor of philosophy at Cambridge University.
  • CORRECT: Dr. Shady Malpractice attended the lecture on medical ethics by Ernst Ruminative, a professor of philosophy at Cambridge University.

See also I.religious titles and I.the Reverend.

titles following a name or used in apposition

Lowercase a civil, military, professional, religious or royal title when it follows the name, stands alone or is used in apposition, not as part of the name but as if it were a job description.

  • INCORRECT: Among the assembled at the theme park opening were the President of ACME Inc., the Chief of Police, newly elected Mayor Vernon Blandly, the Queen of Tasmania and the guy who used to play Rerun on Good Times.
  • CORRECT: Among the assembled at the theme park opening were the president of ACME Inc., the chief of police, newly elected mayor Vernon Blandly, the queen of Tasmania and the guy who used to play Rerun on Good Times.

titles preceding a name

Capitalize a civil, military, professional, religious or royal title when it precedes a personal name.

  • CORRECT: The 2005 Commencement address was delivered in flawless Texan by President George W. Bush.
  • CORRECT: A grandmother of one graduate remarked that the Commencement speaker looked a lot like President Bush, “except around the ears.”
  • INCORRECT: The staffer warned the interns that George W. Bush, President of the United States, thought the shade of bunting they were using was “too girly.” The President favored a stronger blue, he said.
  • CORRECT: The staffer warned the interns that George W. Bush, president of the United States, thought the shade of bunting they were using was “too girly.” The president favored a stronger blue, he said.

See also C.titles.