Inner Compass NATIONAL SEASON 4

Videos & Episode Descriptions

#401 The Power of Writing

30-sec. promo   

[short] When bestselling novelist Wally Lamb (She’s Come Undone, I Know This Much is True) tried his hand at teaching prisoners to write, he had no idea how many lives would be impacted.

[long] We hear about prisoners, but not so often from prisoners. When bestselling novelist Wally Lamb (She’s Come Undone, I Know This Much is True) tried his hand at teaching prisoners to write, he had no idea how many lives would be impacted. Hear how their compelling stories were published after considerable opposition from the prison. Karen Saupe hosts.

 

#402  U.S. Slavery in the North

30-sec. promo

 

[short] When Katrina Browne was 28 years old and in seminary, she learned that her ancestors were the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history. Her response was not typical.

[long] When Katrina Browne was 28 years old and in seminary, she learned that her ancestors were the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history. And, they were not from the South; they had lived in Rhode Island. Katrina wrote to 200 family members, inviting them to explore their family's past. The result: an award-winning documentary, Traces of the Trade, made with co-producer Juanita Brown, who helped plan a journey to Africa for the group and facilitate painful conversations about their discoveries. Karen Saupe hosts.

 

#403 Feasting at a Food Pantry

30-sec. promo

 

[short] Sara Miles, director of St. Gregory's Food Pantry in San Francisco, shares how the unexpected community created there has changed the lives of all involved. Karen Saupe hosts.

[long] Out of curiosity, a woman walks into a church. She’s offered communion, and it changes her life. She ends up turning the feast into a food pantry, which nurtures others (as well as herself) beyond what she ever imagined. Sara Miles, director of St. Gregory's Food Pantry in San Francisco, shares thoughts from her memoirs Take This Bread and Jesus Freak: Feeding Healing Raising the Dead. Karen Saupe hosts.
 

#404 Speaking of Faith

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[short] Krista Tippett, host of the public radio interview show “Speaking of Faith” (now “On Being”), explains the complexities of her values and how she helps her guests reveal theirs.

[long] After Krista Tippett graduated from seminary, she noticed a gap in media coverage. There was plenty of religion coverage (finally), but the simplicity of these stories compelled her to create her own public radio interview show, “Speaking of Faith” (now titled “On Being”). Tippett explains how she helps her guests reveal the complexities of their beliefs and values. Karen Saupe hosts.
 
#405 Democracy & Sharia Law: Can They Coexist?

 

 

[short] Jim Skillen, former president of the Center for Public Justice in Washington, DC, discusses current thinking on whether Sharia law can be combined with democracy.

[long] As we watch Muslim countries consider new forms of government, many in America hope that democracy will win out. But some Muslim countries have used the voting process to establish Sharia law, which includes strict regulations pertaining to punishment, sexuality, religious obligations, hygiene, and personal finances. Jim Skillen, former president of the Center for Public Justice in Washington, DC, discusses current thinking on whether Sharia law can be combined with democracy. Shirley Hoogstra hosts.
 
#406 Transforming Troubled Schools
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[short] Turnaround specialist Sajan George describes progressive technologies and approaches currently under consideration to turn around troubled school districts.

[long] A factory still using production systems from the 1950s would not make sense in today's technological world. Unfortunately, some K-12 schools still use decades-old educational techniques and policies. Turnaround specialist Sajan George describes progressive technologies and approaches currently under consideration to turn around troubled school districts. Karen Saupe hosts.
 
#407 Exchanging Gangs For Jobs
30-sec. promo  

[short] Father Greg Boyle, author of Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion, describes his experiences working with Homeboy Industries in downtown Los Angeles for over twenty years.

[long] Finding a job may not seem the highest priority for most gang members, but Father Greg Boyle learned otherwise when he befriended gang members in his parish and started the largest gang intervention program in the U.S. His book Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion describes his personal experience working with Homeboy Industries in downtown Los Angeles for over twenty years, and he shares what he’s learned. Shirley Hoogstra hosts.
 
#408 Female Asian-Americans: Finding a Voice
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[short] Nikki Toyama-Szeto, co-editor of More Than Serving Tea: Asian American Women on Expectations, Relationships, Leadership and Faith, describes the struggle and joys of finding one’s own calling and voice.

[long] Handling the pressure from society’s expectations is challenging enough; add more demands because of your race, gender, immigrant parents, and religion, and it can be nearly impossible to find your own voice. Nikki Toyama-Szeto is co-editor of More Than Serving Tea: Asian American Women on Expectations, Relationships, Leadership and Faith. She describes the struggles and joys of finding one’s own calling. Karen Saupe hosts.
 
#409 All Kinds of Minds 
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[short] Colorado State University professor Temple Grandin, widely known for her animal welfare research and for her many books on autism, tells how she helps animals and people understand each other.

[long] As a young adult visiting her aunt’s farm, Temple Grandin found herself able to intuit what the livestock feared as they experienced the regular stresses of farm life. Was it because of her autism? Now this Colorado State University professor is widely known both for her animal welfare research and for her many books on autism. She tells how she has dedicated her life to helping animals and people understand each other. Karen Saupe hosts.
 
#410 The Good Life
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[short] Philosopher Jamie Smith, author of Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation, says our idea of what is “the good life” reveals a lot about us.

[long] You may long for the latest gadget or fashion, more because of the image it projects than for any other reason. Where do those images come from? Calvin College philosophy professor Jamie Smith, executive director of the Society of Christian Philosophers and author of Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation, says our idea of what is “the good life” reveals a lot about us. Karen Saupe hosts.
 
#411 Starting a Free African School
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[short] When Twesigye Jackson Kaguri saw Ugandan orphans turned away from school for lack of a pencil, he and his wife decided to use their savings to establish a free school for orphans. [long] Thousands of children in Uganda don’t go to school because their parents can’t afford books, a uniform, or sometimes, just a pencil. The orphans there have even less of a chance. When Twesigye Jackson Kaguri was confronted with this picture, he and his wife decided to use their savings to establish a free school for orphans. Hear his adventures, also described in his book, The Price of Stones: Building a School for My Village. Shirley Hoogstra hosts.
 
#412 “Look at Me!" Narcissism or Self-Esteem?
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[short] Psychologist Jean Twenge, author of The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement, warns that our culture of extreme encouragement may have gone too far. [long] Are teens posting risqué photos on the internet because they are starved for attention, or because they are convinced they’re HOT? Should EVERYONE on the team get a trophy? Jean Twenge of the San Diego State University psychology department, and author of The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement, warns that our culture of extreme encouragement may have gone too far. Shirley Hoogstra hosts.

 

 
#413 U.S. Environment: Our History with the Land

30-sec. promo   

 
[short] Donald Worster of the University of Kansas helped develop the intriguing new field of environmental history to track the intense relationship we’ve had with nature. [long] North American attitudes toward nature have shifted over time, almost as much as our natural landscape has. Donald Worster of the University of Kansas helped develop the intriguing new field of environmental history to track the intense relationship we’ve had with nature. He describes the patterns he’s seen and how America’s history has been shaped by its natural resources. Karen Saupe hosts.