Calvin's official policy on drugs and illicit substances.

  • Approved by: Student Discipline Committee
  • Owner(s): Campus Safety
  • Applies to: Current Students

Calvin College subscribes to the national goal of a drug-free society. Its leadership believes that drug abuse education and prevention programs are essential components of a comprehensive strategy to deal with illicit drug use and alcohol abuse by students and employees on college premises or while engaged in college-related activities. Such abuse of drugs and alcohol by students and employees constitutes a grave threat to their physical and mental well-being and significantly impedes the learning process.

Calvin College will adopt and implement a program to prevent the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees. This program will incorporate the certification requirements of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, and Title XII of the Higher Education Act of 1965 as amended.

Standard of Conduct and College Sanctions

Calvin College prohibits the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of drugs and alcohol by faculty, staff, and students on college property or as any part of college activities. The Employee Handbook for Non-faculty, the Expanded Handbook for Teaching Faculty, and the Student Conduct Code (summarized in the Student Handbook) contain such prohibitions and provide sanctions for violation, up to and including discharge for employees and dismissal for students.

Legal Sanctions

Municipal, state, and federal laws strictly outline penalties--including fines and jail terms--for the illegal use, possession, or distribution of alcohol and drugs. Specific references to laws appear below.

Health Risks

The use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol present major health risks, such as addiction, acute and chronic illness, and death. Other risks associated with alcohol and drug use include impaired learning, violence, injuries, accidents, drunk driving, acquaintance rape, unplanned pregnancies, and sexually transmitted diseases.

Treatment Programs

Alcohol and drug information, referral, counseling, treatment, and rehabilitation programs are available to faculty, staff, and students through a variety of on- and off-campus resources. Some of these services and programs are without charge; other are covered by insurance or based on ability to pay. Students may obtain further information about available services by calling the Broene Center (526-6123). Employees may direct their inquiries to Human Resources (526-6495).

All faculty, staff, and students with questions, concerns or problems related to the use of illicit drugs or the abuse of alcohol are urged to take immediate advantage of the help that is available. All members of the college community, however, must clearly understand that they jeopardize their education, their jobs, their health, and their future if they unlawfully possess, use, or distribute drugs or alcohol at Calvin College. Sanctions for such misconduct will be consistently enforced.

Penalties

The Federal Government and the State of Michigan decide if and how a drug should be controlled. Prescription drugs psychoactive (mind-altering), are categorized according to a Schedule I-V which tells under what conditions a physician can prescribe the drug. This schedule also includes a drug's known and potential value, its potential for physical or psychological dependence, and the risk to public health. Penalties for the illegal sale or distribution of a drug are established using the Schedule I-V.

Schedule I drugs have a high potential for abuse with no medical use. Production of these drugs is controlled. Examples include heroin, methaqualone, all hallucinogens (except phencyclidine-PCP), marijuana and hashish. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), depending on its form, can also be a Schedule II drug.

Schedule II drugs have a high potential for abuse, they also have some medical uses. Production of these drugs is also controlled. Examples include opium, morphine, codeine, some other narcotics, barbiturates, cocaine, amphetamines and phencyclidine (PCP).

Penalties for selling Schedule I and II drugs vary with the quantity of the drug. Additionally, if death or serious injury is associated with the sale, or if it is a second offense, penalties are more severe. When establishing penalties for sale, marijuana and hashish are separated from this designation according to the schedule. The penalties are similar to those set for Schedule I and II drugs. Federal penalties for first offense sale of small amounts of Schedule I and II drugs is not less than five years and not more than 40 years. In the case of death or serious injury, not less than 20 years and not more than life. There is also a fine for the second offense of not more than $2 million of individuals and $5 million for other than individual.

State penalties for "delivery possession with intent to deliver, and manufacture" of less than 25 grams is mandatory one to 20 years; up to $25,000, or life probation. The penalty for possession of less than 25 grams is up to four years, or a fine up to $25,000 or both. Both offenses are felonies. Use of Schedule I and II drugs is a misdemeanor which has a penalty of up to two years, $2,000 fine, or both.

Schedule III, IV and V drugs have some potential for abuse, but less than I and II. The potential for abuse of Schedule IV drugs is less than Schedule III, and Schedule V is less than IV. All drugs in this category have medical uses, and their production is not controlled. Examples include some narcotics, chloral hydrate (IV), barbiturates (III), other depressants (III and IV), amphetamines (III), and other stimulants (III and V).

Federal Penalties for a first offense sale of a Schedule III drug is not more than five years, and a fine of not more than $250,000 per individual, and $1 million, not individual. The penalty for first offense sale of Schedule IV drugs is not more than three years. The fine is the same as for Schedule III drugs. The penalty for first offense sale of Schedule V drugs is not more than one year and a fine of not more than $100,000 per individual or $250,000, not individual.

State Penalties for the sale of some Schedule III drugs is a felony and has a penalty of up to seven years, or a fine of up to $5,000, or both. The penalty for the sale of Schedule IV drugs is also a felony and has a penalty of up to four years, or a fine up to $2,000, or both. The sale of Schedule V drugs is a felony too, and has a penalty of up to two years, or a fine up to $2,000, or both.

Michigan Ordinances

I. OUIL (Operating under the influence of alcohol)
A. Description: A person, licensed or not, under the influence of alcohol, or drugs, or both.
B. Penalty: First arrest - not more than 90 days, or $100-$500 fine, or both.

II. Permitting Person Under the Influence to Drive
A. Description: Allowing intoxicated person to drive in an area open to the public.
B. Penalty: Not more than 90 days, or $100-$500 fine, or both.

III. Minor Possessing or Transporting in a Motor Vehicle
A. Description: Persons under 21 may not possess or transport alcohol in a vehicle.
B. Penalty: Not more than 90 days, or a fine of not more than $100. Vehicle can be impounded.

IV. Purchase/Possess/Consume by Minor
A. Description: Persons under 21 may not purchase, possess, or consume alcohol.
B. Penalty: Civil infraction: first arrest - $25, second arrest - $50, and third arrest - $100.

V. Impaired Driving
A. Description: A person driving in an area open to the public while impaired from alcohol, drugs, or both.
B. Penalty: Not more than 90 days, or a fine of not more than $300, or both.

Alcohol Policy

Listed below are the standards of the Calvin College community regarding the use of alcoholic beverages. The context for these community standards is that Calvin College expects all students to comply with the state of Michigan laws about alcoholic beverages. In the state of Michigan, persons under the age of 21 shall not purchase, consume, or possess alcoholic beverages. In addition, it is against Michigan law to sell or furnish alcoholic beverages to persons under 21 years of age. The goal of the community is that students will make responsible choices about whether or not to use alcoholic beverages. A responsible choice will vary from individual to individual. Because most Calvin students are under the legal drinking age, their choice should be abstinence; for those of legal drinking age, it should be abstinence or moderation. A few must choose abstinence because of their high risk for alcoholism. The laws of the state of Michigan and the community standards ought to guide student decisions about alcoholic beverage use. Students who fail to respect these laws and standards risk the sanctions of this community.

A. Possession and Consumption: Calvin College prohibits the possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages on college premises and in authorized college activities off college premises. The college also expects students who are underage to comply with state of Michigan laws regarding the possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages.

B. Alcohol Containers: Calvin College prohibits the possession of empty alcoholic beverage containers anywhere on college premises including vehicles.

C. Drunkenness: Calvin College expects students of legal drinking age who choose to drink alcoholic beverages to be moderate in their consumption. Any consumption of alcoholic beverages by any age student that results in impairment or intoxication is a violation of community standards.

D. Hosting Responsibilities: Calvin College expects students of legal drinking age, who choose to serve alcoholic beverages to student guests in off premises settings or who choose to host bring-your-own-beverage functions, to be responsible in their hospitality. It is a violation of both Michigan law and community standards to serve alcoholic beverages to underage guests or to require any guest to pay a cover charge for admission to the host's residence. It is a violation of community standards to allow student guests 21 years of age or older to drink alcoholic beverages excessively.

The severity of the sanction will reflect the seriousness of the incident and the student's history of previous violations. Sanctions will range from warning to disciplinary probation, usually coupled with community service hours, special assignments, or monetary fines up to $200. At the time of any disciplinary hearing for an alcohol violation, the Judicial Advisor will determine if an alcohol assessment is indicated and, if so, the student will be required to participate in the assessment if it is included in the disciplinary sanction. Repeated violations may result in suspension.

Financial Aid

Students convicted of any drug offense during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving TItle IV, HEA program funds, under any federal or state law involving the possession or sale of illegal drugs will result in the loss of eligibility for any Title IV, HEA grant or loan assistance.