‘Gravity’ is the visual wonder of the year

File photo.
File photo.

I remember the first time I saw the trailer for “Gravity.” It made me excited to see what the new adventure director Alfonso Cuaron would bring to the silver screen. I thought the trailer looked spectacular.

Everybody else in the theatre, not so much. There were roars of laughter coming from the audience as Sandra Bullock drifted off into space, because, apparently, that kind of thing is funny. I knew that, when the day “Gravity” was released came, it would be labeled as an “instant classic” — and then I’d be the one laughing.

Well that day has come, and the film ended up being better than anyone could have dreamed of. I imagine it’s very difficult to make a movie about two astronauts lost in space an interesting adventure, but thanks to the two outstanding performances from George Clooney and Sandra Bullock — and some of the most impressive visuals I’ve ever seen in a film — it’s a spectacle to behold.

The ride follows astronauts Dr. Ryan Stone (Bullock) and Matt Kowalski (Clooney) as they are ripped apart from their shuttle in space, drift among the stars and help one another survive. My biggest — though rather small — complaint would be in the plot.

The plot was good, maybe great, but it felt like a survival story I’ve seen many times before, just in a different location. But again, that’s just a slight nitpick. The main reason people will go see this film is for the suspenseful moments and the out-of-this-world visuals (literally).

I cannot stress this enough. See it in 3-D, or don’t bother going at all. I know that might be asking a lot of people who aren’t usual moviegoers, but this movie is a once in a lifetime visual experience. I don’t think I would have appreciated this film as much if I had witnessed it on a small TV screen or a laptop for my first viewing.

The large, impactful screen along with the rich 3-D images made me feel as if I was actually drifting along in space with the characters. Normally, I do not condone 3-D, but here I encourage you to check it out. This is the example of 3-D being used, not as a cash grab, but as a tool to enhance the story.

When these characters are thrown into danger, it becomes hard to breathe because you feel as though you are right there with them.

The performances are another reason to invest in this remarkable world. Whether you are a fan of Sandra Bullock or not, it is obvious that she gave it her all; she wins over your heart with her innocent yet fearful personality.

I was worried that her entire performance would consist of panting and screaming as she twirls through the dark depths of space, but she actually has scenes of dialogue where we learn more about her. Her interactions with Clooney’s character make for great comedic interplay between the two.

Clooney’s character is mainly there for comic relief. He’s the wise cracking veteran who knows what it takes to survive and tries to get Bullock and himself back in one piece. While his character wouldn’t make a great lead in the movie, he sure does make a wonderful supporting character.

“Gravity” is a well-told story with groundbreaking visual effects that will be remembered for years to come. This film is the same type as “2001: A Space Odyssey” or “Star Wars” were back in their times.

“Gravity” is destined to become the type of film that you’ll tell your own children was the height of visual achievement when you were young.

Take a chance on “Gravity”; it will be more than worth it. Even if the plot isn’t quite groundbreaking, the visuals more than make up for it.

 

About the Author

Christian Becker

Christian Becker is the Arts and Entertainment Editor for the 2014-2015 school year. He is a senior from Wyckoff, New Jersey studying Film and Media Production. He has a passion for everything pop culture and is excited to share that love with you. When he is not making a fool of myself on the Improv team, you can usually find him in a movie theater.

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