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CCCS Recorded Events

The Bible in Calvin College's Reformed Past and Worldwide Future

Lecture by Mark A. Noll, PhD in honor of the inauguration of Michael K. Le Roy, PhD – October 18, 2012

Because Scripture is foundational in the Christian Reformed Church's Three Forms of Unity and because it was crucial in the inspirational educational work of Abraham Kuyper, the Bible has always been important for the work of Calvin College. But because of the college’s Dutch Reformed heritage, its reliance on Scripture has differed in important ways from how the Bible has been used by other Protestants in America. One of those distinctives has been concentration on the grand arc of biblical narrative (creation-fall-redemption-last things) and the implications of that narrative for all academic disciplines. But now, given the shape of world Christianity, the Dutch Reformed heritage faces a new challenge. In burgeoning Christian movements throughout the world, Scripture has become a guidebook for imitating biblical deeds of charismatic power. This address will ask how the riches of Calvin’s biblical tradition might still be used for the benefit of other believers even as Calvin learns from the great diversity of biblical approaches that now characterizes a rapidly expanding Christian world. Click here for downloadable materials, including responses to this lecture.

Education for Shalom: A Theology of Citizenship for a Complex World

Lecture by Julia K. Stronks, JD, PhD in honor of the inauguration of Michael K. Le Roy, PhD – October 18, 2012

In what way does a Christian liberal arts college respectfully and appropriately educate global citizens to navigate a complex world in which religious practices and beliefs compete? How will Christian students refrain from falling into relativism or vague spirituality if they are working with people committed to different worldviews? One answer lies in the development of a theology of citizenship. Introducing a technique that the U.S. Supreme Court has developed, this presentation will demonstrate how Christians can hold firmly to the convictions of their faith while still working in a religiously diverse environment. Click here for downloadable materials, including responses to this lecture.

The Bond: Our Kinship with Animals, Our Call to Defend Them

The Bond: Our Kinship with Animals, Our Call to Defend Them from Calvin College on Vimeo.

Lecture by Wayne Pacelle - January 19th, 2012

Few are in a position to speak for animals like Wayne Pacelle. As President and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States, he leads 11 million members and constituents in the mission of celebrating animals and confronting cruelty. Learn more about Wayne Pacelle »

Lecture cosponsored by the Philosophy department, The Office of Multicultural Affairs, and the Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship.

Blessed are the Meek: Showing Mercy to all Creation

Blessed are the Meek: Showing Mercy to all Creation from Calvin College on Vimeo.

Paul Shapiro is one of the vanguard voices on animal welfare in the United States. As Senior Director of Farm Animal Protection for the Humane Society of the United States (the largest, most influential animal protection organization in America with well over 10,000,000 members), Paul has overseen campaigns that have changed the legal and political landscape of the movement and fomented legislative change in states such as Michigan, Ohio, Arizona, and California.

Cosponsored by Students for Compassionate Living and the CCCS.

Barth, Bell, and Hell

Barth, Bell, and Hell 10/19/11 from Calvin College on Vimeo.

Kees van der Kooi is an expert on modern Christian theology with special interests in the legacy of John Calvin and the work of Karl Barth. Among his many publications is As in a Mirror: John Calvin and Karl Barth on Knowing God, A Diptych (Leiden 2005). In this lecture he evaluates the controversial book Love Wins by Grand Rapids pastor-author Rob Bell according to the view of universal salvation expounded by the Swiss Reformed theologian Karl Barth, the foremost theologian of the 20th century. Professor van der Kooi is the Director of the Center of Evangelical and Reformation Theology at the VU-University, Amsterdam.

Cosponsored by: the History Department, the Religion Department, and the Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship.

"Every man" heard them speak in his own language

"Every man" heard them speak in his own language 5/4/11 from Calvin College on Vimeo.

James Vanden Bosch, Professor of English at Calvin College, describes the influence of the King James Bible on True Grit, Gilead, The Road, and other contemporary American novels.

Cosponsored by: Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship, Calvin Institute of Christian Worship, Calvin Seminary, Hekman Library, H. Henry Meeter Center for Calvin Studies, Calvin College Departments of Congregational Ministries, English, History, and Religion.

1611

1611: The KJB @ 400 4/15/11 from Calvin College on Vimeo.

Description

Gordon Campbell, Professor of Renaissance Studies at Leicester University, gave a most fascinating lecture on the historical context of the King James Bible translation. He spoke about the influence of William Tyndale, the "He" and "She" Bibles, and much more. The lecture was given on April 15, 2011 in the Calvin Seminary Auditorium.

Cosponsored by: Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship, Calvin Institute of Christian Worship, Calvin Seminary, Hekman Library, H. Henry Meeter Center for Calvin Studies, Calvin College Departments of Congregational Ministries, English, History, and Religion.

 

Ethical Issues in Climate Change: A Theological Perspective

Ethics of Climate Change from Calvin College on Vimeo.

Lecture given by: Steven Bouma-Prediger, Hope College, Holland Michigan

Description

"We are living in a warming world. In such a world, what are the ethical implications of Christian belief in a God who creates and redeems? What does a commitment to "the Maker of heaven and earth" mean for who we are and what we do? Do we who live in the developed world, have ethical obligations to those who live in the less developed world with respect to taking action to address or limit the likely impacts of climate change?  What does climate change imply for how we Christians live?"

The CCCS Working Group, "Climate Change: Complexity, Uncertainty and the Precautionary Principle," led by Ken Piers (Emeriti), Janel Curry (Geography), Del Ratzsch (Philosophy), and Jamie Skillen (Geography) invited Prof. Ackerman to Calvin. The event was co-sponsored by the CCCS and ISRI on Thursday, November 18, 2010 at Calvin College.

 

Responding to Climate Change: The Potential and Risks of Geoengineering Options

Responding to Climate Change from Calvin College on Vimeo.

Lecture given by: Professor Thomas Ackerman, University of Washington

Description

Ackerman’s lecture considers some of the possible geoengineering climate interventions along with some of the ethical and legal questions that will be associated with their use.

Ackerman (Calvin alumnus, 1970) has extensive and distinguished experience in climate research including both observational and modeling studies. He has also previously served as the Chief Scientist of the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, which is the largest ground-based atmospheric observing program in the world. And he currently serves on the science teams of two different NASA satellite-observing systems.

The CCCS Working Group, "Climate Change: Complexity, Uncertainty and the Precautionary Principle," led by Ken Piers (Emeriti), Janel Curry (Geography), Del Ratzsch (Philosophy), and Jamie Skillen (Geography) invited Prof. Ackerman to Calvin. The event was co-sponsored by the CCCS and ISRI on Thursday, October 28, 2010 at Calvin College.

Duty or Delight? Labor and Prayer in the Middle Ages

Duty or Delight? Labor and Prayer in the Middle Ages from Calvin College on Vimeo.

On March 4, 2010, the CCCS hosted John Van Engen, Andrew V. Tackes Professor of History at Notre Dame University.

Professor Van Engen is a historian of religious and intellectual life during the European middle ages. Within those thousand years his work has focused especially upon three large areas: renewal during the twelfth century, “Christianization” in Medieval European history broadly, and religious movements in the later middle ages, especially the Devotio Moderna. His books and essays have dealt with monasticism, women’s writing, schools and universities, inquisition, canon law, notions of reform, and medieval religious culture generally. Beyond editing scholarly symposia, he is actively translating medieval texts from Latin and Middle Dutch, and has underway a large edition of core historical materials for the movement called the Devotio Moderna. Learn more about Professor John Van Engen »

March 4
3:30pm
Meeter Center Lecture Hall

Cosponsored by: Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship, H. Henry Meeter Center for Calvin Studies, Medieval Studies, and Calvin Center of Christian Worship

 

The Bible, Rocks and TimeThe Bible, Rocks and Time:
An Hour with Davis Young & Ralph Stearley

The CCCS celebrated with Davis Young and Ralph Stearley on the publication of their book: The Bible, Rocks and Time (IVP Academic, 2008). Listen to a conversation with Susan Felch and the authors as they talk about the impact of this book in science classrooms among the general public.

Friday, November 14
3:30 PM
Science Building 010

Conversation--audio mp3
(Note: file size is 23.8MB)

"History of Geology at Calvin College"pdf
A lecture by Clarence Menninga, presented April 10, 2001

Cosponsored by: Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship and Calvin College's GEO Department.

Anthony GraftonWriting the History of the Church in the Renaissance: Tradition and Innovation

Anthony Grafton
Henry Putnam University Professor of History
Princeton University

Anthony Grafton is one of the foremost authors and teachers of Renaissance cultural and intellectual history in the United States. His numerous books on Renaissance history and the history of scholarship include: What Was History?: The Art of History in Early Modern Europe; Christianity and the Transformation of the Book; The Footnote: A Curious History; Forgers and Critics: Creativity and Duplicity in Western Scholarship; and Bring Out Your Dead: The Past as Revelation.

Thursday, October 16
8:00 PM
Meeter Center Lecture Hall
Lecture--audiomp3
(Note: The file size is 25.6MB)

Lectures cosponsored by: Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship, Calvin Seminary, and the departments of History, Classics, Religion, and English.

The Religious Heritage of Rights Talk: A Symposium

Two internationally-acclaimed scholars have a very different story to tell about religion and human rights.

John Witte, Jr.John Witte, Jr.
Robitscher Professor of Law and Director of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University, will discuss the roots and origins of a modern account of human rights in early modern Calvinism.

 

 

Nicholas Wolterstorff
Nicholas WolterstorffNoah Porter Professor of Philosophical Theology Emeritus at Yale, will dig back even further, arguing that modern intuitions about rights and justice are indebted to the Hebrew and Christian scriptures--and cannot be sustained by a wholly secular ethos.

March 31
7:00 PM
Commons Lecture Hall

Symposium -- Quicktime Movie (.mov)
(Note: The file size is 228MB; please be patient while the presentation loads.)

Symposium -- Audio mp3
(Note: The file size is 59MB)

Cosponsored by: Service-Learning Center, Sociology and Social Work Department, and Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship

Public Lecture by Dr. Marion Taylor--March 4, 2008

Reading the Scripture with our Foremothers

Marion TaylorWomen have been thoughtful readers of scripture throughout the ages, yet the history of interpretation has not included their voices. Dr. Marion Taylor, Prof. of Old Testament at Wycliffe College, Toronto School of Theology, introduced attentive listeners to the riches that one can discover when uncovering these forgotten writings. Writings by such authors such as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Christina Rossetti, Josephine Butler, Grace Aquilar and many others have much to teach us. Prof. Taylor has co-edited an anthology of women's interpretations of scripture, "Let Her Speak for Herself: Women Writing on Women in Genesis," (2006), and is working on a second volume in the series.

Recovering Nineteenth-Century Women Interpreters of the BibleWe also celebrated the recent publication of Recovering Nineteenth-Century Women Interpreters of the Bible (2007), a co-edited volume by Dr. Marion Taylor and Dr. Christiana de Groot (Religion Department).

March 4
3:30 PM
Commons Lecture Hall
Lecture--Audiomp3
(Note: file size is 28.5MB)

Sponsored by: Gender Studies, Religion Department, and the Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship

Disability Enabling Theology -- February 15, 2008

Amos YongProfessor Amos Yong, associate research professor at Regent University School of Divinity in Virginia Beach, VA, gave the following lecture at Calvin College:

Disability Enabling Theology: Reforming Christian Beliefs--Transforming Christian Practices
  • a new theology for people with disabilities
  • a new theology informed by the experiences of people with disabilities

Friday
February 15
8:00 PM
Meeter Center Lecture Hall
Lecture -- Audio mp3
(Note: file size is 27.9MB)


Amos Yong Power Point Presentation (.ppt)

CCCS Hour Lecture Schedule -- Fall 2007

John Calvin Rediscovered: The Impact of His Social and Economic ThoughtJohn Calvin Rediscovered:
The Impact of His Social and Economic Thought

James Bratt (History) will be discussed his new book that he co-edited with Edward Dommen (United Nations & World Council of Churches), John Calvin Rediscovered: The Impact of His Social and Economic Thought (Westminster/John Knox Press, 2007).

November 14, 2007
3:30 PM
Commons Lecture Hall
Lecture -- Audio mp3
(Note: file size is 30MB)

Sponsored by: The Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship, the Department of History, and the H. Henry Meeter Center for Calvin Studies.

J. Hillis Miller at Calvin, October 18, 2007
Literature and Scripture: An "Impossible Filiation"

J. Hillis MillerOctober 18, 2007
7:00 PM
Calvin College Chapel
Presentation -- Quicktime Movie (.mov)
(Note: This is a 55-minute presentation so the file size is 185MB; please be patient while the presentation loads.)

Presentation -- Audio mp3
(Note: file size is 23MB)

This lecture discusses the relation between literature and Scripture by way of what Derrida says about “impossible filiation.” Miller takes Beloved and The Divine Comedy as examples of literature and the Abraham and Isaac story and the Mary Magdalene story at the end of Luke (recognition of the risen Christ) as examples of Scriptural stories. Miller claims they make quite different claims on the reader's allegiance, but that Western literature, even the most secular, inherits essential things from Scripture. Miller concludes by discussing the so-called “turn to religion” in the humanities today from the perspective of a long career that has seen fads come and go, and religion relocate in university life.

Sponsored by: The Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship, the Office of the Provost, the Department of English, and the Department of Communication Arts and Sciences.

Jeff Sharlet Spoke at Calvin on April 11, 2007

Sharlet PosterFundamentalist History, Secular Myth, and the Media's God Problem

Sharlet offered the reflections of a journalist who's been exploring the spiritual geography of the nation in the post 9/11 era. Read Sharlet's abstract and bio »

Listen to the lecture mp3

February 2007 - CCCS Hour: Book Reception

CRC RCA BookBook reception for: Divided by a Common Heritage: The Christian Reformed Church and the Reformed Church in America at the Beginning of the New Millennium (Eerdmans, 2006). Authors Corwin Smidt and James Penning of Calvin's Paul Henry Institute and Political Science Department, discussed their extensive research on the current positions of both the CRC and RCA.

This was recorded on Wednesday, February 21, 2007 at Calvin College Listen to lecture mp3

Fall 2006 - Slavoj Žižek at Calvin College

ZizekDubbed "the Elvis of cultural theory" by The Chronicle of Higher Education, Žižek's current work interrogates the Christian tradition and argues that it is, in fact, worth saving. In keeping with this thematic, the title of Žižek's lecture for Calvin is "Why Only an Atheist Can Believe." While his lecture will certainly propose a reading of Christianity that is both decidedly non-western and non-orthodox, Žižek's perspective on Christianity as a intellectual from Eastern Europe and an atheist philosopher is sure to bring ideas that will be both provocative and stimulating for the Calvin College community. Streaming video is available in Real Audio format here.

 

How Calvin Fathered a Renaissance in Christian Philosophy

Dr. Nicholas Wolterstorff
February 2, 2001
Calvin Theological Seminary Auditorium

Download MP3 Here mp3
(Note: file size is 76.8MB)

 


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