2014-15 Catalog courses

The courses listed here are those published in Calvin College's current academic catalog. Not all courses are offered in the current year.

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Biological Science

This course is a study of the biological concepts of ecology, genetics, and evolution and their contribution to an understanding of the nature of living systems within the framework of a biblical worldview. An emphasis is placed on the application of these concepts to important contemporary issues, such as environmental stewardship and genetic engineering. Lectures and laboratories.

  • Course code: BIOL-111
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Life Science for Elem Teachers

This course is designed for students in the elementary education program. In this course students use life science concepts in an inquiry-based approach to build a biological knowledge base that is appropriate to the elementary school classroom. The course covers topics in life sciences that are recommended as teaching objectives in elementary education. These include activities studying cells, classification of living organisms, reproduction and heredity, evolution, and how life forms coexist interdependently within ecosystems. Throughout the course a perspective of respect for God?s creation and Christian stewardship of the creation is presented as the purpose for investigating and learning to understand life on earth. Lectures and laboratories.

  • Course code: BIOL-112
  • Credits: 4
  • Department: Biology
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Human Biology

This course is a study of the major theories of biology as applied to human beings. The student is introduced to the concepts of cell, genetics, ecology, and evolution through the study of the anatomy, physiology, and development of the human body and health. Students apply these concepts to contemporary issues in human biology, society, and the environment. The laboratory utilizes methods of biological investigation, with an emphasis on human anatomy and physiology. Lectures and laboratories.

  • Course code: BIOL-115
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Human Biology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-115L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Living Systems

Students construct comprehensive understandings of living systems, interconnecting foundational principles about genes, cells, physiology, ecology, and evolution to each other and to contemporary scientific, societal, ethical, and religious issues. Problem-based learning approaches are employed in this course to examine complex societal challenges, with contemporary problems setting the context for readings, discussions, and laboratory activities that facilitate investigating, thinking, and applying. Three two-hour sessions weekly.

  • Course code: BIOL-123
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Honors Colloquium-The Living World

Students construct comprehensive understandings of the living world, interconnecting foundational principles about genes, cells, physiology, ecology, and evolution to each other and to contemporary scientific, societal, ethical, and religious issues. Biology is taught in this course as it is practiced, as a process of creative and critical inquiry. Contemporary problems set the context for laboratory activities, studies, and discussions that facilitate investigating, thinking, and applying. Three two-hour sessions weekly. Corequisite: Mathematics 143 must be taken concurrently with either Biology 224 or 225.

  • Course code: BIOL-123H
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Cell Biology and Genetics for Health Sci

This course presents the structures, functions, and evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells at the molecular, subcellular, and cellular levels. Fundamental concepts of genetics are studied including Mendelian genetics and molecular genetics. The course introduces basic historical, philosophical, and biblical frameworks for the study of biology. Applications of course concepts to contemporary issues in biology are considered. The laboratory consists of investigations in molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics. Lectures and laboratories. Corequisite or prerequisite: Chemistry 103 or 115, or equivalent.

  • Course code: BIOL-141
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Hnrs Colloquium in Cell Biol & Genetics

This course presents the structures, functions, and evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells at the molecular, subcellular, and cellular levels. Fundamental concepts of genetics are studied including Mendelian genetics and molecular genetics. The course introduces basic historical, philosophical, and biblical frameworks for the study of biology. Applications of course concepts to contemporary issues in biology are considered. The laboratory consists of investigations in molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics. Lectures and laboratories Corequisite or prerequisite: Chemistry 103 or 115, or equivalent.

  • Course code: BIOL-141H
  • Credits: 0
  • Department: Biology
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Cell Biology and Genetics Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-141L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Human Anatomy

A study of the structure of human organ systems, including some developmental anatomy and histology. The laboratory will emphasize human anatomy and will include dissection of a cat as a representative mammal and some study of histology. Lectures and laboratories

  • Course code: BIOL-205
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Human Anatomy Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-205L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Human Physiology

An introduction to the essential functions of the human body. How tissues and organs operate and work together provides an understanding of how the body gets, distributes, and utilizes nutrients, moves, eliminates waste, communicates between tissues and organs, and reproduces. The laboratory introduces basic physiological techniques in an investigative setting. Lectures and laboratories. Prerequisites: Biology 141 (or 224), Chemistry 104, 115 or equivalent.

  • Course code: BIOL-206
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Human Physiology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-206L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Medical Microbiology

A study of microorganisms and their activities as they relate to human health and disease. Topics include significant events in the current and past history of microbial disease, as well as the classification, structure, metabolism and genetics/genomics of microbes. These topics will be discussed in the context of how they contribute to a beneficial symbiotic relationship between microbes and humans as well as how they are a factor in pathogenicity. Diseases due to bacteria and viruses are emphasized, however human fungal, protozoal and multicellular eukaryotic diseases are also discussed. Three hours of lecture and two two-hour laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisites: Biology 141 (or 224) and Chemistry 104 or 115 or equivalent.

  • Course code: BIOL-207
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Medical Microbiology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-207L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Biology for Educators

This course provides a hands-on study of important concepts in biology. The course is designed specifically to meet the needs of teacher-education students who wish to be elementary- or middle-school science specialists. Topics covered include cell structure and function (mitosis, meiosis, protein synthesis), heredity, modern genetics, evolutionary patterns and processes, the characteristics of ecological systems (populations, communities, ecosystems), and human health (nutrition, reproduction and growth, disease). Reflections on the nature of biology and the living world are included, and connections to everyday experience and to technology are discussed. Lecture and laboratory combined. Prerequisite: Science Education 121.

  • Course code: BIOL-212
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Cellular & Genetic Systems

A presentation of the basic concepts in cellular and molecular biology and genetics. Topics include: structure and function of cells and macromolecules; energy and metabolism; cell division and regulation; DNA replication, transcription and translation; genetics; control of gene expression; and cellular mechanisms of development. Students develop critical thinking skills by applying these concepts to a broad array of bioscience problems. Laboratories consist of integrative science research projects that instill scientific competencies and proficiency with the prevailing methodologies in the cellular and molecular biosciences. Lectures and laboratories. Prerequisites: Chemistry 103 (or equivalent).

  • Course code: BIOL-224
  • Credits: 3
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Honors Colloquium in Cell & Genetic Syst

  • Course code: BIOL-224H
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Cellular & Genetic Systems Lab

Laboratory for Biology 224. Corequisite: Biology 224.

  • Course code: BIOL-224L
  • Credits: 1
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Ecological & Evolutionary Systems

The basic concepts in ecological and evolutionary biology, and their use to gain insights into adaptive physiological functions. Topics include: population genetics and ecology, evolutionary development and speciation, phylogenetics and genomics, adaptive biology, ecosystem dynamics, and biodiversity. Students develop critical thinking skills by applying those concepts to solve biological problems and practice basic scientific communication skills. Laboratories make use of state-of-the-art methodologies to address interesting questions about organisms as complex adaptive systems, thereby giving students insights into the practice of contemporary ecological, evolutionary, and organismal biology research. Lectures and laboratories. Prerequisites: Biology 123 or 115, Chemistry 103. Corequisite: Biology 225 Lab. Biology majors and minors must take Mathematics 145 concurrently with either Biology 224 or 225.

  • Course code: BIOL-225
  • Credits: 3
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Honors Ecological & Evolutionary Systems

  • Course code: BIOL-225H
  • Credits: $course1.Credit_Hours
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Ecological & Evolutionary Systems Lab

Laboratory for Biology 225. Corequisite: Biology 225.

  • Course code: BIOL-225L
  • Credits: 1
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Animal Biology

S. An introduction to the biology and diversity of select groups of animals and protists. Topics include taxonomic diversity, structure, and function at the organ and tissue level, and population biology and evolution. Emphasis is placed on considering these topics in an environmental context. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: Biology 141.

  • Course code: BIOL-242
  • Credits: 4
  • Department: Biology
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Honors Colloquium in Animal Biology

  • Course code: BIOL-242H
  • Credits: 0
  • Department: Biology
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Animal Biology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-242L
  • Credits: 0
  • Department: Biology
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Plant Biology

F. An introduction to plant biology that includes a consideration of the structure, function, and developmentof plants as organisms, a consideration of the relationships of plants to each other and the other organisms in a study of selected communities within biomes, and consideration of basic ecosystem approaches, and topics in the diversity of algae, fungi, and plants. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: Biology 141.

  • Course code: BIOL-243
  • Credits: 4
  • Department: Biology
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Plant Biology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-243L
  • Credits: 0
  • Department: Biology
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Research Design & Methodology

A combination of field, greenhouse and laboratory studies designed to familiarize students with research at both the cellular and ecological levels of organization. Emphasis will be on framing research questions, experimental design and data interpretation with reference to the published literature, and on the presentation and communication of scientific data. Under faculty direction student teams will develop their own research projects and present the results of their work in written and oral reports. Social, ethical and religious implications of the results of research will be explored. Two three-hour sessions per week. Prerequisites: Biology 224 and 225, Mathematics 145. Corequisite: concurrent enrollment in Biology 295 is required.

  • Course code: BIOL-250
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Directed Research

The student enrolling in this course will be involved in laboratory or library research on a project currently being studied by one or more staff members. Application forms are available from the department office and admission will be determined by the chair and the faculty member directing the project.

  • Course code: BIOL-290
  • Credits: 1
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Biology Seminar

Various topics in biology and related disciplines are presented by visiting speakers, faculty, and students. Biology and biotechnology majors must register for two semesters of Biology 295 ideally during the junior and senior year. Freshman and sophomore students are also encouraged to attend. Majors intending to graduate with honors must register for three semesters of Biology 295.

  • Course code: BIOL-295
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Paleontology

A study of the organisms that once lived on the Earth. Includes an examination of the processes of fossilization and methods of discovering the structure, habitat, and relationship of those organisms, and a review of their distribution and life history. A broad spectrum of organisms is studied with emphasis on invertebrate animals. Lectures, laboratories, field trip. Also listed as Geology 313. Prerequisite: Geology 152 or Biology 224 and 225.

  • Course code: BIOL-313
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Paleontology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-313L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Genetics and Development

How do we explain the vast diversity in form and function among members of a species? How do we explain the vast diversity in form and function among all of earth?s species? Neither question can be addressed effectively without an understanding of genetics and development. This course examines the nature of biological inheritance and the genetic bases of metazoan development, with a particular emphasis on evolutionary influences. Learning activities will focus on understanding genes and genomes from an evolutionary perspective, and will include lectures, class discussions of scientific papers, laboratory investigations of inheritance and development, and an independent research project. Lectures and laboratories. Prerequisites: Biology 224 or 141, Chemistry 115 and 253 (or 261 and 262).

  • Course code: BIOL-321
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Genetics and Development Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-321L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

A comparative study of vertebrate structure and of the functional significance of these structural variations. Lectures and laboratories. Credit cannot be applied toward a biology major for both Biology 205 and 323. Prerequisite: Biology 225.

  • Course code: BIOL-323
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-323L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Molecular Biology

A study of photosynthesis, biosynthesis of macromolecular precursors, the chemistry of the storage, transmission, and expression of genetic information, biochemical dimensions of selected physiological processes, and philosophical and ethical issues related to biochemistry and molecular biology. Lectures and laboratories (Biology 383). Also listed as Chemistry 324. Prerequisite: Chemistry 323.

  • Course code: BIOL-324
  • Credits: 4
  • Department: Biology
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Biotechnology

How and why do we make recombinant DNAs and transgenic organisms? How and why do we manipulate stem cells? How are these and other forms of biotechnology being applied in medicine, agriculture, industry, forensics, and environmental bioremediation? In reading assignments and discussions, students explore scientific, societal, and Christian perspectives of biotechnology?including biosafety, sustainability, patenting, and ethical concerns. In laboratory exercises, students manipulate DNA, make genetically modified organisms, and analyze the effects of these manipulations. Lectures and laboratories. Prerequisites: Biology 224 (or 141), 250, Chemistry 253 (or 261 and 262).

  • Course code: BIOL-325
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Biotechnology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-325L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Comparative Animal Physiology

A study of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of animals and human beings. Using basic cell and tissue activities as a starting point, this course considers how the various organs, and organ systems operate to provide ways of getting, distributing, and utilizing nutrients, excreting waste, maintaining a near constant internal environment despite changes in the external environment, providing movement, allowing both rapid and slower communications between and among these systems, and reproducing the organism. Lectures and laboratories. Credit cannot be applied toward a biology major for both biology 206 and 331. Prerequisites: Biology 224 (or 141), Chemistry 253 (or 261 and 262).

  • Course code: BIOL-331
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Comparative Animal Physiology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-331L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Plant Physiology

How efficient are plants in converting light energy to chemical energy? How closely is the global food supply tied to energy or fresh water supplies? How do plants complete with other plants, animals, pathogens, or survive climate extremes when they are rooted in place? This course relates the form and function of plants across a continuum from the physiological to the ecological, from the perspective of an individual plant and that of a plant canopy. We will discover the unique ways in which plants respond to environmental stressors like water deficits or excesses, or by producing an astounding variety of strange chemicals or structures to fight pathogens and herbivores. Emphasis will be placed on how humans can use plants to produce food using agroecological methods, to address food production capacity in impoverished areas, to sequester atmospheric carbon, or to restore contaminated land areas. Students will use instruments and methods to evaluate physiological plant functions and then conduct independent investigations using those tools. Prerequisite: Biology 225. Lectures and laboratories. Prerequisites: Biology 224 (or 141) and 205, Chemistry 253 (or 261 and 262).

  • Course code: BIOL-332
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Plant Physiology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-332L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Immunology and Hematology

How does the human body defend against pathogens? How does our defense system distinguish between our own cells and foreign invaders? This study of immunology examines mechanisms underlining the intricate work of the defense network including the innate and adaptive immune systems. Practical topics such as vaccines, AIDS, allergy, transplantation, and autoimmunity also will be discussed. The course includes lectures, class discussions of scientific papers, labs, and an independent research project. Hematologic concepts and practices are addressed in laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: Biology 224 (or 141) and 250, and Chemistry 253 (or 261 and 262).

  • Course code: BIOL-333
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Immunology and Hematology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-333L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Cell and Tissue Culture

Ever wonder what's required for animal cells to live and reproduce outside a multicellular organism? Do they continue their specialized functions? Can they live forever? This course explores the biology, methodology, and applications of animal cell culture, likely the most commonplace and fastest growing technology for studying mammalian cells and harvesting their products. Topics include primary and established cell lines, anchorage dependence, culture environments, including two- and three-dimensional systems, contamination, bioreactors, transformation, immortalization, differentiation, cloning, genetic engineering, and stem cells. Lectures and laboratories. Prerequisites: Biology 224 (or 141), Chemistry 253 (or 261 and 262). Not offered 2013-2014.

  • Course code: BIOL-334
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Cell and Tissue Culture Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-334L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Cell Physiology

A study of the function of animal cells with emphasis on events occurring outside the nucleus. Major emphases include the structure of the cell membrane, functions and interrelationships of membrane transporters and ion channels, synthesis of proteins and targeting of vesicles through the secretory pathway, structure and function of cell surface receptors and their interactions with intracellular signaling pathways, mechanisms of cell motility, and interactions of cells with the extracellular matrix. Concepts will be discussed in the context of historical development, examination of experimental evidence and relationship to the function of tissues and organs. Lectures, problem-based discussions of the primary literature, laboratories. Prerequisites: Biology 224 (or 141) and 225, Chemistry 253 (or 261 and 262); Completion of Biology 206 or Biology 331 highly recommended.

  • Course code: BIOL-335
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Cell Biology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-335L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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General Microbiology

Ever wonder if microbes are important for the well-being of human beings? Do they only infect us and cause disease, spoil food, or promote decay? Why might we have ten times more probiotic bacteria in our digestive tracks than all of our bodily cells combined? In this course students study the immense diversity of microbial life and their creative environmental adaptations. They explore bacteria to remove oil spills, generate electricity, produce biofuels, and manufacture antibiotics. They discuss diseases caused by bacteria, viruses, and other microbes, and study mechanisms by which the immune system defends against such infections. Laboratory sessions focus on common microbiology techniques and include an independent project. Three hours of lecture and two two-hour laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisites: Biology 224 (or 141) and Chemistry 253 (or 261 and 262).

  • Course code: BIOL-336
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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General Microbiology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-336L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Animal Behavior

Why do birds sing and bees dance? Why do ravens yell and hyenas laugh? Why are prairie dogs promiscuous and macaws monogamous? This course explores the diverse ? and sometimes bizarre ? strategies and mechanisms that animals use to solve the same basic problems of life: getting food, avoiding predators, finding mates, raising offspring, and living in groups. Learning activities will focus on understanding animal behavior from ecological and evolutionary perspectives and will include lectures, class discussions of scientific papers, behavioral observations, and an independent research project. Prerequisite: Biology 225.

  • Course code: BIOL-338
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Animal Behavior Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-338L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Entomology

Why are insects the most abundant and diverse animals on earth? What?s the difference between a dragonfly and a horse fly? What can fleas, mosquitoes, and lice teach us about human health and disease? Why are insects our friends and our foes? This course explores the bizarre biology of insects and particularly their interaction with humans. Learning activities will focus on understanding entomology from an ecological and evolutionary perspective and will include lectures, class discussions of scientific papers, laboratories exercises on insect morphology and classification, and an independent research project. Prerequisite: Biology 225.

  • Course code: BIOL-341
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Entomology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-341L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Vertebrate Biology

The lives of vertebrate animals attract our attention in ways unparalleled by other groups of organisms. From grand migrations, to elaborate fossils histories, to the roles vertebrates, including ourselves, play in the functioning of the biosphere, our fascination with these animals drives the programming content of many media outlets today. This course explores the range of vertebrate animals with an emphasis on their evolution, taxonomy, ecology, and conservation. Lectures and laboratories. Prerequisite: Biology 224 (or 141) and 225.

  • Course code: BIOL-344
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Vertebrate Biology Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-344L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Ecosystem Ecology and Mgt

The lives of human beings and countless other creatures are sustained by the goods and services resulting from the proper functioning of earth?s ecosystems. As the human population places increasing pressure on these systems, the need for their careful stewardship and management grows. This course provides a detailed study of ecosystem structure and function, with special emphasis on local ecosystems, and the scientific basis for managing and restoring ecosystems. Specific topics include energy flow and nutrient cycling, biodiversity and endangered species management, conservation genetics, population dynamics, landscape ecology, and human dimensions of ecosystem management. Lectures, laboratories, case studies, and field investigations. Lectures and laboratories. Prerequisites: Biology 224 (or 141) and 225.

  • Course code: BIOL-345
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Ecosystem Ecology and Mgt Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-345L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Plant Taxonomy

Identification, nomenclature, and classification of vascular plants. Emphasis will be placed on the practical use of keys to identify plants in a variety of natural environments, including forests, meadows, and wetlands. Relationships among phyla, families, and species will be explored, particularly in relation to their roles within the ecosystem types where they typically are located. Lectures, laboratories, and field trips. Prerequisite: Biology 224 (or 141) and 225.

  • Course code: BIOL-346
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Plant Taxonomy Lab

  • Course code: BIOL-346L
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Investigations in a Specific Topic

The course is a directed investigation of a topic that will vary depending on the interest and expertise of the instructor. Field and/or laboratory studies will emphasize reading and interpretation of scientific literature, study design, experimental conduct, data collection and analysis, as well as written, multimedia, and/or poster presentations. Two laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor (obtain course application from the department website).

  • Course code: BIOL-354
  • Credits: 4
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Invest. in DNA Technology

S. A directed investigations course in which students employ molecular biology methods to characterize DNA clones from gene libraries, analyze the expression patterns of these clones, sequence them, use bioinformatics to characterize putative gene products, and design primers for realtime RT-PCR gene expression analysis. Course projects culminate in multimedia or poster presentations of results. Two labs per week. Prerequisites: Biology 141, Chemistry 253, or 261. Recommended: Biology 256.

  • Course code: BIOL-356
  • Credits: 4
  • Department: Biology
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Invest In Biol For Teachers

* F. This course, intended for biology majors and minors in the education program, is designed to train students in the use of laboratory for investigating and understanding the content of biology. Typically, all students study topics in plant and animal genetics, physiology, behavior, anatomy, and ecology. Individually, students select a content area for further exploration. Students instruct each other through investigations designed to guide their discovery and understanding of biological concepts. In doing so, students model the investigative process that builds and critiques the content base of biology. Students use computers for data collection, analysis, and presentation. A final presentation of independent research in a selected content area is required. Prerequisites: Biology 242, 243, and permission of the instructor.

  • Course code: BIOL-357
  • Credits: 4
  • Department: Biology
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Global Health, Environment, & Sustainabi

Global health and food matters are best understood within their biological, ecological, and socio-economic contexts. This course explores how processes in these contexts contribute to health and disease, especially as they pertain to international and community development. Food will be utilized as an organizing theme with which to inspect the intimacy of relationships between environmental and human health in both local and global contexts. Globalization presents opportunities and challenges for health and food security and for ecosystem integrity. Development models that enhance these by strengthening human-environment interconnectedness, using responsible technologies, and developing just policies are upheld as exemplars. Prerequisite: living world core.

  • Course code: BIOL-364
  • Credits: 3
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Laboratory in Biochemistry

F and S. A laboratory course designed to teach students modern biochemical separation and analytical techniques. Included in this course are the following topics: Exclusion, ion-exchange, affinity, and high performance liquid chromatography, agarose gel and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation, ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, enzyme kinetics, and recombinant DNA techniques. Students will be required to carry out individual projects involving the purification and analysis of a biological macromolecule from cells or tissue. Also listed as Chemistry 383. Pre or co-requisite: Chemistry 323.

  • Course code: BIOL-383L
  • Credits: 1
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Internship in Biology

This course is an off-campus internship that emphasizes professional application of the concepts and principles learned as part of a Biology program. A student has responsibilities in a private firm, office, laboratory, a not-for-profit organization, or a government agency. The intern works on a specific project under the direct supervision of an employer-supervisor and a faculty internship coordinator. The intern will meet with the faculty coordinator, will maintain a journal, and must present an oral or written report summarizing the internship experience. The off-campus employer-supervisor will complete an evaluation report on the work of the intern. With faculty approval, this course may satisfy the investigations requirement in the biology major or biotechnology minor. Only one Biology 385, 390, or 399 course may be used to satisfy the requirements for the biology major or biotechnology minor. Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing in biology, a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better, an average GPA of 2.0 or better in all credited science and mathematics courses, and approval by both the department and the off-campus employer. The internship advisor is J. Ubels.

  • Course code: BIOL-385
  • Credits: 0
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Independent Study

This course provides the opportunity for a student to conduct library research, or under the direction of a faculty member, to study a subject not currently offered in the biology curriculum. Permission to enroll must be obtained from the department chair and the faculty member directing the project. Requirements will be determined by the supervising faculty member. Only four credit hours of Biology 390 or 399 may be used to satisfy the requirements of the biology major.

  • Course code: BIOL-390
  • Credits: 1
  • Semester: Interim
  • Department: Biology
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Perspectives in Biotechnology

What do Christian perspectives contribute to the myriad of controversies pertaining to biotechnology? Using current literature and evaluating underlying assumptions as well as their social, ethical, and legal implications, we attempt to find appropriate answers to questions about transgenic organisms, stem cells, cloning, patenting. Environmental implications of biotechnology also are considered. Student mastery of biological communication is assessed through written and oral presentations. To aid the department's curricular assessments, completion of the biology major field test also is required.

  • Course code: BIOL-394
  • Credits: 3
  • Department: Biology
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Perspectives in Biology

How do conceptual and technological innovations, worldviews, and the inherent limitations of the scientific enterprise affect the way that biology develops? By studying current literature, students examine how Christian and secular perspectives inform the big challenges of our time, including environmental sustainability, evolutionary science, biotechnology, and the biology of the human organism. Student mastery of biological communication is assessed through written and oral presentations. Prerequisites: senior status in a biologically-oriented program or permission of the instructor, biblical/theological foundations I, IDIS 150, and philosophical foundations.

  • Course code: BIOL-395
  • Credits: 3
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Perspectives in Medicine

How do historical and philosophical perspectives affect the science and practice of medicine, particularly the methodology, results, and implications of current medical research? By studying the medical literature students explore societal and ethical issues in medicine, from the status of embryos to end-of-life questions. Student mastery of biological communication is assessed through written and oral presentations. Prerequisites: senior status in a biologically-oriented program or permission of the instructor, biblical/theological foundations I, IDIS 150, and philosophical foundations.

  • Course code: BIOL-396
  • Credits: 3
  • Semester: Fall, Spring
  • Department: Biology
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Undergraduate Research

Students enrolling in this course will conduct laboratory or field research under the supervision of a faculty member. The project may be part of an ongoing research program of the supervising faculty member. A written thesis on the project will be required, as well as presentation of a poster or seminar to the department. Permission to enroll must be obtained from the department chair and the faculty member directing the project, and with their permission, this course may fulfill the requirement for an upper-level research experience in the biology major. Only four credit hours of Biology 390 or 399 course may be used to satisfy the requirements of the biology major.

  • Course code: BIOL-399
  • Credits: 1
  • Semester: Fall
  • Department: Biology
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Independent Study

  • Course code: BIOL-590
  • Credits: 1
  • Department: Biology
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Biology Interim

Interim course descriptions are posted online at: www.calvin.edu/go/interim/

  • Course code: BIOL-W10
  • Credits: 3
  • Semester: Interim
  • Department: Biology
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Biology Interim

  • Course code: BIOL-W40
  • Credits: $course1.Credit_Hours
  • Semester: Interim
  • Department: Biology
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Biology Interim

Interim course descriptions are posted online at: www.calvin.edu/go/interim/

  • Course code: BIOL-W60
  • Credits: 3
  • Semester: Interim
  • Department: Biology
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Biology Interim

Interim course descriptions are posted online at: www.calvin.edu/go/interim/

  • Course code: BIOL-W61
  • Credits: 3
  • Semester: Interim
  • Department: Biology
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Biology Interim

Interim course descriptions are posted online at: www.calvin.edu/go/interim/

  • Course code: BIOL-W62
  • Credits: 3
  • Department: Biology
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Biology Interim

Interim course descriptions are posted online at: www.calvin.edu/go/interim/

  • Course code: BIOL-W80
  • Credits: 3
  • Semester: Interim
  • Department: Biology
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Biology Interim

Interim course descriptions are posted online at: www.calvin.edu/go/interim/

  • Course code: BIOL-W81
  • Credits: $course1.Credit_Hours
  • Semester: Interim
  • Department: Biology
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Biology Interim

Interim course descriptions are posted online at: www.calvin.edu/go/interim/

  • Course code: BIOL-W90
  • Credits: 3
  • Semester: Interim
  • Department: Biology
CODE NAME CREDITS
BIOL-111 Biological Science 4
BIOL-112 Life Science for Elem Teachers 4
BIOL-115 Human Biology 4
BIOL-115L Human Biology Lab 0
BIOL-123 Living Systems 4
BIOL-123H Honors Colloquium-The Living World 0
BIOL-141 Cell Biology and Genetics for Health Sci 4
BIOL-141H Hnrs Colloquium in Cell Biol & Genetics 0
BIOL-141L Cell Biology and Genetics Lab 0
BIOL-205 Human Anatomy 4
BIOL-205L Human Anatomy Lab 0
BIOL-206 Human Physiology 4
BIOL-206L Human Physiology Lab 0
BIOL-207 Medical Microbiology 4
BIOL-207L Medical Microbiology Lab 0
BIOL-212 Biology for Educators 4
BIOL-224 Cellular & Genetic Systems 3
BIOL-224H Honors Colloquium in Cell & Genetic Syst 0
BIOL-224L Cellular & Genetic Systems Lab 1
BIOL-225 Ecological & Evolutionary Systems 3
BIOL-225H Honors Ecological & Evolutionary Systems
BIOL-225L Ecological & Evolutionary Systems Lab 1
BIOL-242 Animal Biology 4
BIOL-242H Honors Colloquium in Animal Biology 0
BIOL-242L Animal Biology Lab 0
BIOL-243 Plant Biology 4
BIOL-243L Plant Biology Lab 0
BIOL-250 Research Design & Methodology 4
BIOL-290 Directed Research 1
BIOL-295 Biology Seminar 0
BIOL-313 Paleontology 4
BIOL-313L Paleontology Lab 0
BIOL-321 Genetics and Development 4
BIOL-321L Genetics and Development Lab 0
BIOL-323 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 4
BIOL-323L Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Lab 0
BIOL-324 Molecular Biology 4
BIOL-325 Biotechnology 4
BIOL-325L Biotechnology Lab 0
BIOL-331 Comparative Animal Physiology 4
BIOL-331L Comparative Animal Physiology Lab 0
BIOL-332 Plant Physiology 4
BIOL-332L Plant Physiology Lab 0
BIOL-333 Immunology and Hematology 4
BIOL-333L Immunology and Hematology Lab 0
BIOL-334 Cell and Tissue Culture 4
BIOL-334L Cell and Tissue Culture Lab 0
BIOL-335 Cell Physiology 4
BIOL-335L Cell Biology Lab 0
BIOL-336 General Microbiology 4
BIOL-336L General Microbiology Lab 0
BIOL-338 Animal Behavior 4
BIOL-338L Animal Behavior Lab 0
BIOL-341 Entomology 4
BIOL-341L Entomology Lab 0
BIOL-344 Vertebrate Biology 4
BIOL-344L Vertebrate Biology Lab 0
BIOL-345 Ecosystem Ecology and Mgt 4
BIOL-345L Ecosystem Ecology and Mgt Lab 0
BIOL-346 Plant Taxonomy 4
BIOL-346L Plant Taxonomy Lab 0
BIOL-354 Investigations in a Specific Topic 4
BIOL-356 Invest. in DNA Technology 4
BIOL-357 Invest In Biol For Teachers 4
BIOL-364 Global Health, Environment, & Sustainabi 3
BIOL-383L Laboratory in Biochemistry 1
BIOL-385 Internship in Biology 0
BIOL-390 Independent Study 1
BIOL-394 Perspectives in Biotechnology 3
BIOL-395 Perspectives in Biology 3
BIOL-396 Perspectives in Medicine 3
BIOL-399 Undergraduate Research 1
BIOL-590 Independent Study 1
BIOL-W10 Biology Interim 3
BIOL-W40 Biology Interim
BIOL-W60 Biology Interim 3
BIOL-W61 Biology Interim 3
BIOL-W62 Biology Interim 3
BIOL-W80 Biology Interim 3
BIOL-W81 Biology Interim
BIOL-W90 Biology Interim 3
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  • Semester:
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