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Registration: Summer

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Admission and registration

Registration for Summer 2014 begins on March 1.

Costs

  • Tuition and fees
  • You may be eligible for financial aid.
  • An enrollment deposit of $300 is required by undergraduate summer guests before registration can be completed. The entire amount is applied to the tuition cost of the summer course(s).
  • For graduate workshop information, see the Graduate Studies in Education webpage.
  • General questions or comments regarding the summer semester should be directed to the Academic Services office.

Course load

The maximum student load is five semester hours per summer session.

Schedule changes and withdrawing from a course

The last day to add a course is the third day of the session. The latest date for dropping a course or changing a registration from credit to audit (or vice versa) is the tenth day on which the class meets. Deadlines for evening or special courses may vary. Check the Registrar's Office for advice.

Tuition charges for student withdrawing from a summer course will be refunded as follows:

  • Class days 1-2: 100%
  • Class days 3-4: 50%
  • Class days 5-6: 25%
  • No refund after the 6th class day

High school students welcomed

College-bound high school students are encouraged to dually enroll in college level courses at Calvin. High school students must have completed their sophomore year and be entering either their junior or senior year. They must have at least a 3.2 grade point average and the endorsement of their high school principal or guidance officer and apply at the Calvin Admissions Office.

Housing and meals

Limited housing is available on campus at Knollcrest East Apartments for summer school students. For further information, contact: Summer Housing, Knollcrest East, Calvin College, Grand Rapids MI 49546, call (616) 526-6120 or e-mail housing@calvin.edu. The Student Commons provides snacks and noon-meals for summer students.

Practical advice

Summer semester courses are concentrated into a shorter time span than regular semester courses. Students taking courses that meet during the day, each day of the week, should be very cautious about taking on the responsibilities of employment during the time they are taking the course. Taking only an evening course may allow more flexibility, but caution should be exercised in taking on too much outside employment. Evaluations and surveys from past summer semester students indicate that the tension between demands of employment and demands of a course may cause significant stress. This can be avoided with proper planning. Students are advised not to commit themselves to full time employment while attending classes.