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Registration: Interim

Interim 2010

History

W40 Vietnam and Cambodia: Legacy of Empire & War.  This is an on-site course on the history and culture of Vietnam and Cambodia as it was affected by French colonialism and the ensuing war with the United States.  Students prepare by reading a text on Vietnamese and Cambodian history and discussing the material in class before our departure. We then travel to the main cities and sites where French colonialism and the war with the United States made their deepest impact.  Places of focus will include Hanoi, Hue, Hoi An, My Son, Ho Chi Minh City, the Mekong Delta, and finally Cambodia.  Students tour the main historical sites and talk with former soldiers and government officials in order to understand the history and culture of Vietnam, including the American War, from the Vietnamese perspective. Students record their thoughts in a journal and write an essay based on that journal and their readings and classdiscussions. This course may fulfill an elective in the History major, if taken for honors credit and the International Development Studies major. This course will fulfill the CCE requirement. Course dates:  January 4-22.  Fee: $3950.  W. Van VugtOff campus.

W41 A Cultural History of Games.  The aim of this course is to examine how humans have symbolically expressed their attitudes to their cultural surroundings in various board, table, and lawn games throughout the course of history. Throughout history, people have used games as a form of pastime and diversion. But games also functioned as ways to come to grips with the realities of life, and even afterlife, and were a way for human to symbolic meaning to the world around them.  Each class will explore the historical setting of these ancient games, and thus the class will be an excellent introduction to the history of Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, India and Persia, Rome, early medieval Scandinavia, high medieval France and late medieval England. The reading will include Johann Huizinga’s seminal work Homo Ludens.  The class will explore the historical setting of these ancient games in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, India and Persia, Rome, early medieval Scandinavia, high medieval France and late medieval England.  By engaging with historical world cultures in a practical and hands-on way and learning about the games they played, students will learn how games can serve as an important symbolic representation of the values of these societies.  Readings will include Johann Huizinga's seminal work Homo Ludens.  Students will write essays on topics of their choice, linking the games studied to the historical period in which they were created. This course may fulfill an elective in the History major.  F. van Liere.  8:30 a.m. to noon.

294 Research Methods in History (2 semester hours). This course is an introduction to historical sources, bibliography, and research techniques, by giving particular attention to the different genres of history writing, the mechanics of professional notation, critical use of print and electronic research databases, and the development of critical reading skills with respect to historical exposition and argumentation. In this letter-graded course, evaluation is based on several reports, essays, and a final exam. Prerequisite: one course in history or permission of the instructor. NOTE: This is a required two-semester hour course in the history major.  W. Katerberg.  2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

IDIS W45 Italy: Ancient & MedievalK. Bratt, Y. Kim.

IDIS340 Field Work in Archaeology. B. de Vries.

IDIS 375 Methods & Pedagogies for Secondary Social StudiesR. Schoone-Jongen.