Skip to Navigation | Skip to Content

Registration: Interim

Interim 2007

Developing a Christian Mind (DCM)

Developing a Christian Mind (DCM) is a first-year core course that introduces students to the central intellectual project of Calvin College, the development of a Christian worldview, and a faith-based engagement with culture. All DCM sections include common readings and plenary lectures, which sketch out the broad contours. Each section then works out the implications of a Christian frame of reference in relation to an issue of contemporary relevance. Student evaluation is based on classroom participation, quizzes on the readings and lectures, writing assignments or presentations, and a final exam.

150 01 DCM: A Christian Response to Racism. Racial inequality has characterized the history of the United States since its earliest days. While most Christians would agree that racism is a sin, few understand its continued presence or scope of impact in the United States . Racism, by any definition, is a form of oppression that affects all people and is a reflection of the injustice that plagues our world. Racism is a reminder that life on earth is not the way it was meant to be. This course examines different levels of racism including individual, i nstitutional and internalized racism. A particular focus will be to develop a growing consciousness of how race affects our own daily lives as well as the life of organizations, institutions and societal structures. In this course students have an opportunity to study the complex social reality of racism, investigate responses to racism from Christian institutions and leaders, and develop their own plan of response. We will seek ways we can work against racism, thus fulfilling part of our calling to work for justice in our society as citizens of God's kingdom. This course includes films, lectures, journals, discussions, and student presentations. G. Gunst Heffner . 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.  

150 03 DCM: A Christian Response to Racism. Why are we still talking about racism in 2007? Haven't we legislated the problem away? Isn't it just ancient history? While most Christians would agree that racism is a sin; few understand its continued presence or scope of impact in the United States . And just when we think we “really can all just get along”, there is a major news story with charges of racism in the headlines. Racism, by any definition, is a form of oppression that affects all people. Racism is a reminder that life on earth is not the way it was meant to be and is a reflection of the injustice that plagues our world. As Christians we are to respond to injustice and work for justice in our society. In this course students will have an opportunity to study the complex social reality of racism, investigate responses to racism from Christian institutions and leaders, and develop their own plan of response. This course includes films, lectures, journals, discussions, and student presentations. J. Rhodes . 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.  

150 04 DCM: A Christian Response to Refugees. Refugees have been a part of history since Adam and Eve were kicked out of the Garden. What should the response be to humans displaced by natural and manmade disasters? Who should manage such responses? How are Christians to respond to crises in non-Christian communities? This interim intends to offer a theoretical introduction to the promotion of human rights for refugees and displaced persons. Focus is on the development and definition of key concepts, on regional and international institutions involved with refugees, and on current issues relative to refugees. D. Slager. 8:30 to noon.

  150 05 DCM: Documentary Film and Photography. From the prevalence of documentary images at recent international art exhibitions, to the popularity of reality TV, still and moving images based on the concept of the “real” have gained new attention in the arts and visual culture of the late 20 th and early 21 st century. How “real” are documentary images? And what does it mean that we are still fascinated by looking at the “real” world? This class examines documentary still and moving images from a historical perspective, including documentary art photography, news photography, and films from the 1920s to the present. As a DCM class, the course is intended to raise questions around the implications of the “truth value” of documentary images, and the function of images that show us the historical world by placing the history of these images within the context of theories of looking and representation. When documentary images are effective, they challenge us to question our assumptions about social categories, how we perceive and communicate with others and ourselves. They also can move us to recognize evil and suffering, and/or push us to marvel at the world we live in. Class sessions involve lectures, close analysis of images, screenings, and discussions. Evaluation is based on position papers based on the readings, an in-class presentation, and a final exam. L. VanArragon. 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 06 DCM: Thinking About Decisions and God's Will. How does our reasoning shape our beliefs and how do our beliefs shape our reasoning? This course explores decision making as it relates to understanding ourselves, others, and God. A particular focus is how strengths and weaknesses of human decision making influence our choices and ability to choose. In addition, understanding God's will in light of our reasoning practices is examined. Students will understand the notion and shaping nature of world views; reformed perspectives. Students will identify strengths and weaknesses of human decision making and will also identify ways to improve your decision making skills. Finally, students will develop an understanding of and appreciation for ways to explore God's will. D. Tellinghuisen. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

150 07 DCM: Dramatic Families: Dreams, Dysfunctions, and Occasional Solutions in Shakespeare and Modern Drama. This course will examine a number of plays featuring families suffering from maladies such as death, abandonment, and betrayal; these same families have members who each have their own dreams and aspirations. We will ask questions such as these: What has brought about these problematic situations? How do characters' dreams seek to rise above the dysfunction? How are they the cause of it? How is hope present in (or absent) the different families? Students in this section will study Shakespeare's The Tempest , Henrik Ibsen's A Doll House , Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman , Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie , and Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun . Students are encouraged to watch videos of these plays during optional afternoon screenings. D. V. Urban. 8:30 a.m. to noon.  

150 08 DCM: Global Climate Change. Global climate change is a widely discussed topic today: in the media, among politicians, among scientists. Yet the various summaries offered often seem mutually exclusive. Have we ruined our environment beyond repair? Or is it simply not possible for humans to have a significant impact at all? In this course students will practice reasoning skills needed to sift through competing claims, and to define which issues, if any, are pressing. Further, students will consider moral questions are raised by the scientific results, such as stewardship of a common earth or justice when the actions of one group affect the environment of another. Finally, students will consider how environmental policies must balance environmental, moral, and economic factors. L. Molnar. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.  

150 09 DCM: Having Faith in the Theatre. This course explores theatre as a cultural art form through which we see and learn about ourselves as Christians in this world. The theatre, as an imitative art form, is a unique window through which we might observe human behavior and human culture, in all of its fallenness and all of its grace. Through watching plays, reading plays, and discussing them in class, we will explore topics ranging from the mystery of human existence to the importance of laughter and comedy. Readings and viewings will be drawn from the contemporary world theatre scene, examining how theatre is dealing with current issues and deep human needs. The plays we examine will mostly be from the past five years of theatre; plays such as Doubt , Wicked , TopDog/Underdog , and History Boys . S. Sandberg . 8:30 a.m. to noon.  

150 10 DCM: Human nature: Psychological and Religious Perspectives. Does the Bible or religion have anything to say to Psychological Science? This course suggests that psychological issues have been contemplated throughout history. Issues such as mind and body, emotional disorders, child development, and social interactions have been addressed by many religious traditions. Students will review some of the basic topics of current psychological science. Each area will be followed by an exploration of what people – particularly as found in the Bible - have historically understood about these issues. Discussions will focus on the contrasts and similarities between each perspective. Considerable weight will be given to appropriate ways to understand biblical passages, theological interpretations and modern psychological theories. Discussions will also focus on ways to develop a coherent approach to resolve apparent conflicts or to benefit from each perspective. Students will lead many of the discussions and there will be several small group presentations and discussion sessions. S. da Silva. 8:30 a.m. to noon .  

150 11 DCM: Human nature: Psychological and Religious Perspectives. Does the Bible or religion have anything to say to Psychological Science? This course suggests that psychological issues have been contemplated throughout history. Issues such as mind and body, emotional disorders, child development, and social interactions have been addressed by many religious traditions. Students will review some of the basic topics of current psychological science. Each area will be followed by an exploration of what people – particularly as found in the Bible - have historically understood about these issues. Discussions will focus on the contrasts and similarities between each perspective. Considerable weight will be given to appropriate ways to understand biblical passages, theological interpretations and modern psychological theories. Discussions will also focus on ways to develop a coherent approach to resolve apparent conflicts or to benefit from each perspective. Students will lead many of the discussions and there will be several small group presentations and discussion sessions. P. Moes. 8:30 a.m. to noon .  

150 12 DCM: Infinity and the Christian Mind. A.W. Moore has well said that infinity “must raise questions of the most fundamental kind about the world, about us, and about our place in the world.” It is a concept that has intrigued not only mathematicians, philosophers, and theologians, but also musicians and artists. This course focuses on the development of the concept of infinity in mathematics and philosophy, beginning with the Greeks (Plato, Aristotle) and medieval philosophers (Aquinas, Nicholas of Cusa). Students consider how the discovery of Calculus ( Newton , Leibniz, Berkeley ), the introduction of rigor leading to transfinite set theory (Cantor, Bolzano , Gutberlet), and the reactions to the paradoxes involved (Brouwer, Hilbert, Wittgenstein, Dooyewerd) have further developed the notion of infinity. The interplay among mathematics, philosophy, and theology is particularly important as students reflect on the significance of infinity, not only in relationship to intellectual history, but also in relationship to our lives of faith. T. Scofield. 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 13 DCM: Interpersonal Relationships. Students investigate the psychology of interpersonal relationships-particularly one-to-one relationships-by examining their initiation, development, and patterns of interactions. Discussion includes topics such as roles, motives, aspirations, expectations, communication, self-disclosure, and resolution of problems. Classes consist of lectures, small-group discussions, and analysis of case studies, films, and videotapes. The initiation, breaking, and restoration of relationships is an example of the creation/fall/redemption theme that will be developed in this course. Evaluation is based upon daily written assignments, daily attendance, analysis of case studies, a book-based paper, class participation, and a final test. A. Shoemaker. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.  

150 14 DCM: Living the Magnificat. The Magnificat, or Song of Mary [Luke 1:46-55] is an early Christian canticle that evokes numerous Old Testament texts, and includes the “great reversal” in which God humbles the mighty ones, and exalts the lowly. This text is found in the worship traditions of all Christians [Roman Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant], and has multiple meanings and applications right into the present day. This interdisciplinary course will examine the text itself, study the uses of this text in Christian worship & music and personal piety, explore the role of this text in Mariology and Marian visual art, and take a critical look at the importance of this text in contemporary liberation theology and other recent Christian documents about social structures and public policy. The course requires oral group presentations and written work; there are no undue expenses beyond minimum costs for some personal field trips in the GR area. B. Polman. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00.  

150 15 DCM: Luck, Chance, Statistics. Public opinion polls both reflect and shape public opinion, but how are they conducted and what do they really mean? What position should one take regarding lotteries and casinos? What is a false positive, and how does that affect my health care choices? This course equips students with the reasoning skills necessary to interpret and evaluate many of the statistical arguments that are common in contemporary speech. Discussions focus on how probability and statistics can be used to seek truth and pursue justice, but also how they can be used to deceive and manipulate. Particular attention is paid to public opinion polls and other surveys of human subjects. Advantages and disadvantages of putting our trust in numbers and the role of probability as a part of creation may also be considered. No previous statistical training is required, but a willingness to learn the necessary mathematical material is assumed. The course focuses on a conceptual understanding of probability and statistics and on the issues surrounding their pervasiveness in our culture, rather than on the technical skills required to be a practitioner of statistics. R. Pruim. 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 16 DCM: Models as Mediators. Students study and discuss the many and varied ways in which models function in natural and social science, particularly in the field of Economics with some attention paid to the field of Physics. A framework is offered for understanding how models can act as mediators with special attention paid to autonomous mediators. On a parallel track students study the mediation of Christ with the goal of understanding how general revelation might mirror or illuminate special revelation. The major objective is for students to understand the role of models in modern culture and how that relates to the nature and work of their Savior. There are no extra expenses involved. Kurt Schaefer has agreed to guest lecture on Karl Marx's model of the economy. Evaluation will be based on the following four things: A final examination with one part covering the common material and a second part covering section material, a team presentation sharing the results of research on some aspect of mediation not covered in class, quizzes (every other day), and finally, classroom participation. D. Laverell . 8:30 a.m. to noon.

  150 17 DCM: Money Matters. This course focuses on personal finance decisions that students face now and will face in the future, such as consumer issues. Students develop a personal finance framework for giving, budgeting, saving, and investing—resulting in individual budgets to put into practice now. Working from this framework, students then explore selected contemporary consumer issues, such as fair-trade products, state-sponsored gambling, and socially responsible investing. Students analyze biblical concepts developed and/or critiqued from a Reformed worldview to find ways and means for Christians to be agents for renewal in the marketplace. M. Sampson Edgell. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

150 18 DCM: Multisensory Worship. As they critically examine the formal elements of art and popular culture, students are led in the study of aesthetic principles governing the creation of ministry and fellowship aids, then challenged to apply those principles in collaborative design projects which may include power point, video, website design, worship bulletins, cooking, painting, photography, aromatherapy and architecture. Some fees and transportation may be necessary to support a trip to an art museum, a trip to a local restaurant, and to prepare a worship feast. In my offerings of this course elsewhere, these have typically been provided by the students themselves merely paying their own way. B. Fuller. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.  

150 19 DCM: Puritans and their Neighbors. Full Title: Puritans and their Neighbors: Community and Conflict in Early New England . The New England Puritans came to the New World in the 1600s to establish covenanted societies and reformed churches apart from the perceived corruptions of England and Anglicanism. They did not come alone, however, nor was the New World as unpopulated as they wished. In fact, the Puritans were a minority in New England, which has led one scholar to argue that the P-word that best describes colonial New England is “pluralism,” not “Puritan.” How did the Puritans interact with their neighbors? This course will examine the reformed worldview of the Puritans, their changing views of the ideal and godly community, and their responses to religious, political, and cultural diversity. Topics covered will include: the Puritan Great Migration; covenant theology and Puritan political thought; gender relations; popular religion and the Puritan practice of piety; the challenge of Quakers, Baptists and other forms of religious diversity; Salem witchcraft; the Praying Towns and wars with Native Americans; and the roots of the Great Awakening. Implicitly, we will also consider what this seventeenth-century experiment in reformed living should--or shouldn't--teach us today. W. Van Arragon. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.  

150 20 DCM: Reading Genesis in the Context of Modern Science. In this course students explore and reflect on the problem that modern evolutionary science creates for the traditional Christian doctrine of creation, especially at the points where that doctrine is shaped by the origin story of Genesis. Students read and discuss the problem as described analytically in texts and then look at diverse theories that Christian scholars have offered for reading Genesis in response to it. Readings include origin stories in translation from the Ancient Near East, for which students develop keys to interpreting such cosmogonies successfully. Students also explore similarities and differences between these stories and the account of creation in Genesis. Course objectives are to become informed on this textual problem, to understand the debates over how to engage it, and to appreciate the plausibility of differing approaches to the problem. J. Schneider . 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 22 DCM: Take Back Your Time. Our lives are out of balance. We worship our work, work at our play and play at our worship. These distortions affect our perceptions of ourselves, our relationships with others, and most importantly, our relationship with God. We may wonder, “Do I realize life while I live it, every, every minute?” This class will examine some of the personal and socio-cultural forces that drive us toward time famine and will assist in developing a new perspective that will help us cope with these pressures. Throughout this course students will identify the basic personal and socio-cultural forces that contribute to time famine in their lives, gain an understanding of how to cope with these forces from a Reformed Christian perspective, and will also develop and begin to implement a personal plan that will help them address these time famine issues. G. Van Andel. 8:30 a.m. to noon .  

150 23 DCM: The Politics of AIDS in Africa . This course begins by examining the magnitude of the AIDS pandemic in Africa . Students investigate the complex factors that have contributed to the spread of the disease. Students also question the numerous effects the disease has had on individuals, families, and communities and on political, economic, social and cultural systems. Students next explore the ways that global institutions, governments, nongovernmental organizations, churches, and individuals have sought to address AIDS. The course gives special attention to the role of politics and power in addressing the pandemic. Throughout the course, students are asked to examine how the Reformed concepts of creation, fall, redemption, and common grace inform their understanding of AIDS in Africa . The goals of this three week course are as follows: to expose students to the widespread nature of the pandemic in Africa, to examine the economic, cultural, political, and environmental factors which have contributed to the spread of AIDS in Africa, to examine how the pandemic has impacted Africa economically, politically, and socially. Students will also question the impact of AIDS on the least powerful members of society, particularly women and children specifically investigating how power, political institutions, conflict, and globalization have both contributed to and been impacted by AIDS. Students will identify how global institutions, governments, nongovernmental organizations, churches, and individuals have sought to combat the disease, and will examine how Reformed concepts such as creation, the fall, redemption, and engagement with the world can enrich our understanding of the pandemic. Students will also be encouraged to question our responses to the pandemic as Christian citizens in a global community. Throughout the course students complete readings on the pandemic from a variety of academic and news sources, as well as first-person accounts from Africans living with the disease. A. S. Patterson. 8:30 a.m. to noon .  

150 24 DCM: The Scandal of the Incarnation. This section is designed for students who wish to explore in greater theological depth various readings of the Creation-Fall-Redemption paradigm and the implications the Christian doctrine of the Incarnation of the Son of God might have for that paradigm. Readings will be from St. Irenaeus, the 2nd century theologian who first clearly articulated the Church's response to the growing anti-creational and anti-incarnational threat of gnosticism. Implications for the contemporary setting of Christians and Christian churches in American society will be discussed. A. Griffioen. 8:30 a.m. to noon .  

150 25 DCM: The Totalitarian Temptation. What was the appeal of Nazism and Marxism-Leninism in the twentieth century? Both systems had worldviews of religious scope that claimed to answer all of life's questions and to provide meaning for human life. These claims put them in direct conflict with Christian worldviews. This course examines the propaganda that promoted and sustained Nazi Germany and the German Democratic Republic ( East Germany ), seeking to understand how evil systems generated widespread support . R. Bytwerk . 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 27 DCM: Worldviews and the Natural Environment. The theme that this course will explore is how worldviews shape our behavior toward and interaction with the natural environment. In particular we will study the modernist worldview, a postmodern response to it and then some explicitly Christian worldviews with respect to our relationship to the natural world. The theme part of the course will also include a study and discussion of particular environmental issues of importance in today's world. The main way that these issues will be addressed is by way of student group research and presentations of their research findings in the classroom and by way of a poster session. A. Leegwater. 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 28 DCM: Worldviews and the Natural Environment . Environmental issues generate much debate in the press, among policy-makers, and on a personal level. What shapes our view of the natural environment and how do these views affect our response to environmental issues? This course examines how different worldviews play out in human interaction with the created world. In particular, students study modernist, postmodern, and some explicitly Christian worldviews with respect to our relationship to the natural world. This course seeks to cultivate a mature Christian response to environmental issues, drawing on biblical themes of creation, fallenness, and redemption and their implications for environmental action, as well as develop a mode of being in this world that is consistently inspired by a Christian worldview and a Christian mind. G. Bakker . 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

150 29 DCM: Music, Manipulation, and the Mind of God. This course will examine music's power to persuade in light of the Christian's call to spiritual freedom and service. A primary object of study will be film music. Students need to be willing to evaluate both aspects of music and some of the primary means and manners by which people in our society engage with it. D. Fuentes. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

150 30 DCM: Unexpected Guests. This course examines assumptions and common misperceptions connected with disability and especially meanings that reside in the mind of the observer rather than inherently in conditions labeled as physical, cognitive or emotional impairment. Facilitating inclusion of persons with disability labels into the life arenas of work, worship, recreation, education, and community living is a primary goal of the course, as is understanding the themes of powerlessness, interdependence, and hospitality to stranger as they affect each of our lives. In addition to readings, discussion, and written reflection, students will interact with people who live with disability and critique depictions of disability in popular media. T. Hoeksema . 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 pm.

150 31 DCM: Jesus, the One Name that Saves, and Other Faiths. World events reveal a variety of faiths interacting and often conflicting. These other faiths concern politicians and missionaries, but also each citizen of North America , for Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, and Hindus are now neighbors, met in stores and streets. This course explores the relation of the Christian claim that Jesus is the only way to the Father to the claims made by other faiths. Using Reformed teaching on the Creator, common grace, the mystery of God's plan, and some key passages in the prophets, the gospels, and Acts, it looks for ways to maintain the uniqueness of the Christian faith while being open to civil dialogue with those of other faiths. M. Greidanus. 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 32 DCM: Total War: A History of World War II in Europe . World War II is one of the most significant and influential realities of the twentieth century. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the world-historical significance of the war and to evaluate it from a Christian perspective. The course consists of three parts. The first part addresses the necessary background information for understanding the outbreak of World War II. In this section considerable attention is given to the analysis of the Nazi worldview and its origins. Also in this section of the course the Marxist worldview is given attention since in a way World War II was a battle between Marxist Russia and Nazi Germany. The next section addresses the major phases of the war. A major component of this section is an analysis of the connection between worldviews and decisions regarding the Holocaust, military policies, and the like. The third section of the course focuses on some of the consequences of the war, including the Cold War and the creation of the state of Israel . In the latter case, the worldview of Zionism is explored as the main factor that led to the creation of Israel . A very significant aspect of this course consists of viewing videos and movies that tell the story of World War II from a variety of perspectives. F. Roberts. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

150 33 DCM: Suffering and the Problem of Evil. What can we say about natural disasters like tsunamis, droughts or earthquakes? Is God in control of his creation? If God is good, why do bad things happen to good people? Every worldview must confront the issues of suffering, the existence of evil, and death. This course examines Reformed Christian perspectives on these difficult topics, finding similarities and differences with other worldviews. The unique role of Christ brings particular perspective to questions such as: Is it possible to fulfill Christ's calling without suffering? Are suicide and euthanasia deadly sins? How should Christians respond to persecution? The class includes small-group discussion, analysis of case studies, and films. D. Bud . 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 34 DCM: Education and the Movies. This course will explore how the world of the education has been portrayed in the movies. By offering descriptions of the current condition in the classroom or exhibiting positive and negative models of teachers, movies portray particular perspectives that may offer valuable lessons for those interested in teaching. Building on that data and the student's own school experiences several kinds of questions will be considered in the light of a biblical framework. What is the purpose of education? How do schools embody a worldview? What is the nature of effective instruction? What is the role of the teacher? What should be taught? How can schools be structured to enable rather than control students? Answers to these questions will be analyzed by using a variety of sources, such as the Bible and educational thinkers like Parker Palmer and Nel Noddings. The course is intended for students who are interested in exploring the profession of teaching and developing a beginning perspective of what it means to teach. R. Buursma. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

CANCELED 150 35 DCM: Education and the Movies. This course will explore how the world of the education has been portrayed in the movies. By offering descriptions of the current condition in the classroom or exhibiting positive and negative models of teachers, movies portray particular perspectives that may offer valuable lessons for those interested in teaching. Building on that data and the student's own school experiences several kinds of questions will be considered in the light of a biblical framework. What is the purpose of education? How do schools embody a worldview? What is the nature of effective instruction? What is the role of the teacher? What should be taught? How can schools be structured to enable rather than control students? Answers to these questions will be analyzed by using a variety of sources, such as the Bible and educational thinkers like Parker Palmer and Nel Noddings. The course is intended for students who are interested in exploring the profession of teaching and developing a beginning perspective of what it means to teach. A. Boerema. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

150 36 DCM: Writing the Christian Life. Autobiographies and personal memoirs are among the most popular genres of contemporary literature. They run the gamut from promotional to confessional and from self-serving to self-abasing. While most modern memoirs have little or no overt religious content, the genre was created by one of the greatest writers of the early Christian Church, Augustine of Hippo, and many later memoirists and autobiographers have echoed the themes of his Confessions . Starting with Augustine's classic Confessions , students read a series of autobiographies spanning sixteen centuries and representing a wide range Christian perspectives and faith backgrounds, that grapple with some of the perennial questions of human life. (Why did my life turn out this way? What have I learned from my mistakes? Who deserves the credit or blame for all this? Am I free to start over again? Is this really part of God's plan? ) This course does not, of course, promise answers to such questions, of course, but it offers intellectual and spiritual stimulation by engaging students with a variety of points of view from different literary, theological, and historical contexts. K. van Liere. 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 37 DCM: They Even Quote it in Wedding Crashers : Bible Knowledge for Everyday Life. Fell asleep in high school Bible class? Didn't have a high school Bible class? Wish you knew more about the Bible? Wish you knew something about the Bible? This class will provide an introduction to and overview of the Bible, while also giving you the tools you need to dig deeper. A great class for anyone who wants to gain a working knowledge of biblical literature and doesn't want to look like an idiot acquiring it. All comers and all questions are welcome. Can't spell Habakkuk? Can't say Habakkuk? Don't know the difference between Israel and Judah ? Or Peter and Paul? Mary and Martha? Then this is the class for you. Together we'll learn the books of the Bible, the genres of biblical literature, and the trajectory of scripture while reading the Bible, watching a few movies, viewing some TV shows, and discovering what ever happened to the Jebuzites. We'll go to chapel and see how the Bible frames worship on campus. We'll go to a church service (or two) and see how the Bible is used there. We'll evaluate media used to teach the Bible to kids. M. Hulst . 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 38 DCM: Art and Christianity . What is “Art”? Can it be defined to the exclusion of certain forms of creativity? Is any form of artistic expression “better” than another? Is any one form of “Art” more “Christian” than another? In this course, students will examine the historical shifts in perspective on such questions in the world of the visual fine arts, leading to the phenomenon of “modern art.” The contemporary efforts of modern art to deconstruct classical artistic assumptions will provide a key focal point. Students will be asked to critically engage these modern efforts and assess what, if anything, a Christian worldview has to say (positively or negatively) to this topic. N. Jacobs . 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 39 DCM: The American Scene . Beginning with the thesis that landscapes are texts this section of DCM is an exploration of the Christian Worldview as an interpretive perspective for reading the vernacular landscape (i.e. the natural environment as modified by humans) of the American scene. The themes of creation, fall, and redemption provide penetrating and unique insights into American culture as manifest in the landscape; they also provide criteria for evaluating the diversity of contemporary interpretations of the landscape competing with each other to define the American scene today in order to control the creation of the American scene of tomorrow. Topics of interest include land use patterns and changes over time (including landscapes of abandonment), changing views on suburbia, mass transit, the automobile, development, and wilderness areas, urban and rural development, planning, and renewal, livable and sustainable communities, vernacular architectural trends and place names, resource exploitation, etc.B. Baugus . 8:30-noon.

150 40 DCM: Breaking Down Barriers: Theatre, Identity and Faith. Ever since the Greeks celebrated the god Dionysus through annual theatre festivals, tribes danced in mask and chanted around fires, bards recited ancestral and legendary stories, and clowns made riot in any performance space, theatre has helped us understand what it means to be human. Dramatizing our foibles, longings, strivings, and failings, the stage depicts the full spectrum of human experience, allowing us to see the consequences of human frailties and passions. We are invited to laugh at human foolishness and to weep with characters who are undone by circumstance. Theatre also breaks down barriers by allowing us to see that a character from centuries past, from a continent away, from a culture unlike our own, is nevertheless much like ourselves human, fallible and broken, searching for meaning and identity, searching for God. By dramatizing the substance of human behavior and interaction, theatre prompts us to ask ourselves: Who am I? Where do I belong? What is my purpose in this world? This course will examine several plays that highlight how theatre helps us to understand identity and faith: Siswe Bansi is Dead, Wit , Proof , The Importance of Being Earnest, China Doll, Los Vendidos , Children of a Lesser God and The Heidi Chronicles among other s. D. Freeberg . 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 41 DCM: Earthkeeping - Sustainable Agriculture. This course will compare and contrast two models of agriculture: industrial agriculture vs. sustainable agriculture, with the goal of discovering a model of “earthkeeping” that heals and preserves God's creation, instead of harming it. Two books will be consulted: Eric Schlosser's “Fast Food Nation,” and Michael Pollan's “Omnivore's Dilemma.””Engaging God's World”; the DCM common text, will provide an initial and very general theological framework for thinking about eating as a moral act, which will be enlarged at the end of the course with a study of The National Catholic Rural Life Conference's campaign, “Ethics of Eating.” In the DCM Film Series, “An Inconvenient Truth,” a documentary about global warming, will be required. A. Mast . 8:30 a.m. to noon.

150 42 DCM: The Church in the 21 st Century. Few institutions have undergone more change in the past twenty-five years than the local Christian church. Changes in worship style, music, the visual arts, and the role of lay leadership are just a few of the elements that have driven these changes. These shifts have challenged many Christians to reexamine the question: What is the role of the local church in the Kingdom of God ? As we enter the 21 st century, society is becoming more pluralistic, more secular, and more materialistic. Local churches must be ready to respond and speak clearly to these and other issues. This course will challenge students to think about their individual roles within the local church, and to think carefully about the nature and mission of the local church within a broad Kingdom context. Students will be expected to visit various local churches. S. Greenway . 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

150 43 DCM: A Christian Perspective on Vocation and Work. This course will explore fundamental questions of identity—who am I; why am I here; where am I headed. “Vocation does not come from willfulness, no matter how noble one's intentions. It comes from listening to and accepting ‘true self' with its limits as well as its potentials.” (Palmer, 2000) Through reflective assignments, personal case studies and speakers, selected readings and interactive discussions, students will gain a clearer perspective of themselves. More specifically, students will engage with and prepare for future direction in light of an understanding of their distinct gifts and an increased understanding of diverse opportunities within the world of work. D. Hebreard & B. Speyers. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

150 44 DCM: Worldviews and the Natural Environment. The slogan of the post World War II “chemical boom” was “better living through chemistry,” and indeed these chemicals brought many benefits in the areas of industry, agriculture, and public health. However, in 1962 Rachel Carson's book Silent Spring challenged the public's optimism regarding chemicals by revealing many environmental and health consequences of pollution. While many harmful chemicals were restricted and regulated during 1970s and 80s and better procedures for assessing chemical risks were developed during the 1980s and 90s, the publication of Our Stolen Future during the mid 1990s opened the eyes of scientists, policy-makers, and the public to the ability of some chemicals to disrupt hormonal systems at very low doses in wildlife and humans. Today we face a toxic legacy of older pollutants, emerging concerns about several new classes of chemicals, and the revival of old debates such as the use of DDT for controlling malaria in tropical counties. Approximately 60-80,000 chemicals are used currently worldwide, with 1-2000 new chemicals introduced every year. This course explores issues and controversies related to the sustainable use of chemicals in both developed and developing countries. Scientific and policy-related issues are examined within the context of Christian perspectives on the environment. K. Grasman. 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

150 45 DCM: Global Christianity: a Novelist’s Perspective. The late Japanese novelist Shusaku Endo often described a tension between his Catholic and Japanese selves. In his fiction, Endo explored the nature of these tensions, using a variety of metaphors to symbolize the deep differences between East and West and between pantheism and Christianity. What offers hope in his fiction of moving beyond this impasse are the frequent images of Jesus as faithful companion whose love extends beyond cultural boundaries. Endo’s fiction provides a concrete illustration of the phenomenon of global Christianity, and we will draw on the resources of Scripture and the creeds to help us understand the challenges and possibilities for the Gospel to take root in all cultures. Our readings will include several short stories and the novels Wonderful Fool, The Samurai, and Deep River.

Interim 2007 Subjects

DCM
Interdisciplinary (IDIS)
Art
Biology
Business
Communcation Arts & Sciences
Chemistry
Classics
Computer Science
Dutch
Economics
Education
Engineering
English
French
GGES
Germanic & Asian Languages
Greek
History
HPERDS
International Development
Mathematics
Music
Nursing
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religion
Science Education
Sociology & Social Work
Spanish