Evaluating Internet Sources Basic Criteria for Evaluating Sources Peer-Reviewed Journals Research: Evaluating Sources Research: Locating Sources Ethical Issues What is a scholarly source? The Changing Nature of Information Research: Using Databases Research: Techniques and Tools Research : What is it? The Changing Nature of Information


Peer-Reviewed Journals

One of the easiest ways to insure that you are using scholarly sources is to look for journals that are "peer-reviewed". The terms "peer-review" or "refereed" refer to a journal's policy of having experts or a review board critique an article before publishing it. Peer-review insures that journal articles are considered valid contributions by scholars in a specific field.

Peer-Reviewed Articles

One of the easiest ways to insure that you are using scholarly sources is to look for journals that are "peer-reviewed". The terms "peer-review" or "refereed" refer to a journal's policy of having experts or a review board critique an article before publishing it. Peer-review insures that journal articles are considered valid contributions by scholars in a specific field.

Your professor may ask you to use only peer-reviewed journals in researching and writing your paper. You can determine if a journal is peer-reviewed/refereed by searching the journal title in Available only to the Calvin Community Ulrich's Periodical Directory.

Some of the Research Databases subscribed to by the library allow the user to limit a search for articles contained only in scholarly, academic, or peer-reviewed journals. Visit this page to see how.

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These pages were written by Glenn Remelts. and edited by Jeffrey L. Nyhoff and Nancy Zylstra
©2005 Calvin College, All Rights Reserved

If you encounter technical errors, contact rit@calvin.edu.