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Academics: Course Descriptions

Psychology Courses 2014-2015

151 Introductory Psychology: Perspectives on the Self (3 hours) F and S. This course provides an introduction to psychology’s study of the biological, affective, cognitive, and social dimensions of human identity and behavior. It includes the consideration of such issues as perception and consciousness, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, personality development and social interaction, stress and adjustment. Students are introduced to the methods of psychological research and to the role of psychology in scientific endeavor and human application. Through assigned reading and writing as well as classroom discussion, students learn to critically weigh alternative claims regarding human behavior and to appreciate a holistic approach to the study of persons. Watch a professor introduce this course.

Course Level: 100 | 200 | 300

201 Developmental Psychology: Lifespan (3 hours). F and S. An overview of human psychological development from birth to death. The primary objective is to understand the behavior characteristic of each stage of development and the factors which influence that behavior. Recommended for non-majors. Not open to students who have taken or plan to take Psychology 208 or 209. Prerequisite: Psychology 151 or Education 302, or permission of the instructor. Watch a professor introduce this course.

202 Youth Faith Development and Spiritual Formation (3 hours). F. This course examines how faith is formed and developed by studying influential theories of Faith formation (e.g., Fowler’s stages of faith, Objects-Relations) and the general developmental theories on which these faith formation theories are based. Approximately 1/4 of the course is devoted to faith formation in children with particular emphasis on how early attachments shape a person’s view of God. The remainder of the course focuses on the development of religious identity and practices during adolescence and early adulthood. Contextual influences examined include family, peers, schools, religious congregations, historical traditions, organized rites of passage, and post-modern culture. Religious identity is viewed as intertwined with gender and ethnic identity. Recommended for non-majors. Not open to students who have taken or intend to take Psyc 208 or 209. Prerequisite: Psychology 151 or Education 302, or permission of the instructor. Watch a professor introduce this course.

208 Developmental Psychology I: Child (3 hours). S. An overview of normal development from conception through puberty. Organization is chronological (infant, toddler, preschool, middle-childhood) and conceptual (physical development, cognitive development, social-emotional development, spiritual development). Service learning at an area preschool required of all students. Recommended for psychology majors and for non-majors intending to work with children. Not open to students who have taken or plan to take Psychology 201 or 202. Prerequisite: Psychology 151 or Education 302 or permission of the instructor. Option to satisfy the core CCE requirement by completing BOTH psyc 208 & 209. Watch a professor introduce this course.

209 Developmental Psychology II: Adolescence and Adulthood. (3 hours). S. An overview of normal human development from puberty through late adulthood. Organization is chronological (early adolescence, middle adolescence, late adolescence/early adulthood, etc.) and conceptual (physical development, cognitive development, social-emotional development, spiritual development). Part of the homework Professor Yonker assigns is creating the life histories of older adults. Recommended for Psychology majors and nonmajors who desire a comprehensive understanding of human development. Prerequisite: Psyc 208 or permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have taken or plan to take Psyc 201 or 202. Option to satisfy the core CCE requirement by completing BOTH psyc 208 & 209. Watch a professor introduce this course. N

212 Psychopathology (3 hours). F and S. A study of the wide range of abnormal behaviors. Emphasis is on causes, dynamics, and classification, with some attention to treatment approaches. Prerequisite: Psychology 151 or permission of the instructor. Watch a professor introduce this course.

213 Mental Health and the Classroom (3 hours). An introduction to the developmental needs and common developmental stressors of school age children. Emphasis is on the methods of communication and classroom management, which allow the teacher to promote healthy adjustment. Prerequisite: Psychology 151 or Education 302, or permission of the instructor. Not offered 2014-2015.

220 Psychological Perspectives on Marriage and the Family (3 hours). S. This course focuses on psychological theory, research, and perspectives on family life. The course examines historical and current conceptualizations of the family as well as cross-cultural and alternative conceptualizations. Psychological perspectives on marriage preparation, marriage, divorce, infertility, child rearing, and single parenthood, as well as developmental changes in the family are addressed. The course also focuses on family dysfunction, treatment, and health. Prerequisite: Psychology 151 or permission of the instructor.

222 Human Sexuality and Gender (3 hours). This course explores the ways that sexuality and gender have been studied as variables in psychological research and theory. Special attention will be given to recent theories of physiological and cultural influences on men’s and women’s development. Biblical and popular perspectives on sexuality and gender issues will be examined, and promises and problems in gender relations will also be studied. Prerequisite: Psychology 151 or permission of the instructor. Not offered 2014-2015.

255 Statistics and Research Design. (4 hours) F and S. This course is an introduction to statistics and computer application in psychology. Concepts and procedures taught include levels of measurement, measures of central tendency, correlation techniques, probability theory, and hypothesis tests. Lab work includes the use of SPSS software. This course is intended to meet the core Mathematics requirement for Psychology majors and minors. Psychology students typically take this course in their sophomore year. Prerequisites: An introductory course in one of the social sciences (e.g., Psychology 151) and meeting the Calvin admission requirement in Mathematics. Watch a professor introduce this course.

256 Fundamentals of Research and Practice (4 hours). F and S. This course will provide hands-on, participatory research activities that build on the basic theories and applications of Psychology 255. Students will be conducting projects that allow the learning of fundamental practice skills in community or social science research, but also provide additional practice and theory building in statistics and basic research methods. Specific concepts will include basic perspectives in social science research, the fundamentals of measurement in social sciences, sampling techniques, survey design, application of statistical methods to real world situations, use of SPSS, ethical issues in research, and the critical evaluation of research methods and results. Prerequisites: An introductory course in one of the social sciences (e.g., Psychology 151) and Psychology 255.

280 The Helping Interview: Theory and Practice in Clinical Settings (2 hours). This course focuses on psychological theory, research, and practice in regard to the interview. Emphasis is on historical and current conceptualizations of interviewing techniques and processes. Theory, issues, and techniques regarding the interview are applied to both clinical uses and organizational settings. Prerequisite: Psychology 212 or permission of the instructor. Not offered 2014-2015.

Course Level: 100 | 200 | 300

310 Social Psychology (3 hours). F and S. A study of how people think about, influence, and relate to one another. Attention is given to such topics as persuasion and attitude change, conformity and obedience, group conflict and decision-making, stereotypes and illusions of social thought, attraction and prejudice, and altruism and aggression. Prerequisite: Psychology 151 or permission of the instructor.

311 Theories of Personality (3 hours). F and S. A study of the enduring human personality characteristics that often distinguish one person from another. Extensive consideration is given to biological, psychodynamic, social, cognitive, and trait-descriptive theories of personality structure and functioning. The course also introduces students to a variety of personality scales and inventories designed to identify important individual differences in personality. Prerequisites: Psychology 151 and 212 or permission of the instructor.

312 Clinical Assessment (3 hours). S. An introduction to the theoretical and practical issues of psychological testing and measurement. Topics include: Test construction, reliability and validity of tests, evaluation of commonly used tests including measures of intelligence, personality, development, and emotion, exposure to measures used in multiple settings including neuropsychology, assessment in clinical and counseling psychology, school assessment, and industrial/organizational psychology, and the socio-cultural, educational, and legal issues involved in testing and measurement. Prerequisite: Psychology 255 or permission of the instructor. Watch a professor introduce this course.

314 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy (3 hours). F. An introduction to counseling and psychotherapeutic methods for dealing with emotional disorders. The course includes an overview of major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy with an analysis of the theoretical aspects and techniques employed. An attempt is also made to integrate these various approaches and to view them from a Christian perspective. Prerequisites: Psychology 212 and 311 or permission of the instructor. Watch a professor introduce this course.

322 Perspectives in Psychology: Cross-Cultural Psychology. (3 hours). A study of the multicultural components of human behavior, mental processes and spirtuality. Special attention will be given to research on cross-cultural aspects of critical thinking, perception, emotional states and expression, psychological disorders, cross-cultural social interaction, and spirtuality and religiosity. Applications to cross-cultural health care, business, education, and mission-relief work will be discussed. This course meets the cross-cultural engagement core requirement. Prerequisite: 151 or permission of instructor. Not offered 2014-2015.

330 Psychology of Motivation (4 hours). An investigation of physiological, learning theory, and social-cognitive explanations of motivation. Topics include: Brain mechanisms influencing hunger, sexual desire, attention, punishment and reward, drug effects on personality, emotional processes in addiction, drive and incentive effects in clinical disorders and work activity, gender and culture differences in achievement and power motives, decisional processes in learned optimism, and applications of theory to learning in inner city classrooms and to industrial productivity. The study of motivation is presented as a model for understanding inter-relationships among different approaches to psychological theory and research. Two-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Psychology 151 or permission of the instructor. Recommended: Jr./Sr. status. Not offered 2014-2015.

333 Brain and Behavior (4 hours). F. This course explores the rapidly expanding knowledge of brain function that is having a major impact on the way we understand everyday behavior, personality, and human nature. Specific topics include the relationship of brain function to vision, sleep, sexuality, memory, language, emotions, anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and homosexuality. The course includes an introduction to the work of clinical neuropsychologists and cognitive neuroscientists by way of clinical case studies. Class discussions and readings also focus on our understanding of persons in light of this research. Laboratory and off-campus experiences introduce basic anatomy and physiology of the brain, electrophysiological measures (EEG), behavioral measures of brain function, and neuropsychological testing. Prerequisites: Psychology 151 and Biology core or permission of the instructor. Recommended: Jr./Sr. status.

334 Cognitive Psychology (3 hours). S. A survey of research and theory in the study of human cognition. The course covers the acquisition, representation, and use of knowledge with emphasis on the processes of memory, language, and decision-making. Prerequisite: Psychology 151 or permission of the instructor. Recommended: Jr./Sr. status.

335 Health Psychology (3 hours). S. This course considers the psychosocial and physiological processes that underlie wellness. The role of stress in cardiovascular disease, cancer, drug addiction, sleep disorders and eating disorders is considered. The centrality of immune and cardiovascular system functioning in health and illness is emphasized. Attention is given to the effectiveness of a wide variety of coping strategies including pain control, physical exercise, and religious practice. Across topics, the course will emphasize current treatment procedures and research issues in the field. Laboratory experiences will permit students the opportunity to learn and practice skills associated with the health psychology profession and research. Prerequisite: Psychology 151 or permission of the instructor. Recommended: Jr./Sr. status.

356 Experimental Psychology (4 hours). F. This course explores experimental designs and the statistical techniques related to them. Students will have hands-on experience with experimental control techniques, factorial designs and interaction effects, and the use of the analysis of variance. In addition, students will design their own experimental research, implement their studies and analyze the resulting data. This course is a preparation for graduate-level research. Prerequisites: Psychology 255 and 256 and departmental approval of student application.

366 Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3 hours). F. A consideration of psychological concepts and research related to human action in work situations, particularly in organizations. The principles of industrial and organizational psychology and human resource management are applied to current topics including organizational identity, psychometrics for screening and selection, employee socialization, performance measurement and management, and employee attitudes and behaviors. The relationship of psychological theory and practice are analyzed through case studies of organizational experiences. Also listed as Business 366. Prerequisites: Business 160 or Psychology 151 and Mathematics 143 or Psychology 255.

380 Internship in Psychology (4 hours). F and S. Students are placed in a field experience related to a specialized area of psychological practice or research (e.g., school psychology, industrial-organizational psychology, or counseling-rehabilitation psychology). Students work eight hours per week under the direction of an on-site supervisor and participate in regular seminar meetings conducted by the college instructor. These experiences will introduce students to service in professional psychology, as it is related to issues of psychological theory, research, client characteristics and needs, professional standards, and Christian discipleship. Each student will author a project that communicates learning throughout the internship. Prerequisites: Junior or senior psychology major, completion of course sequences related to the internship specialization (information available from the Psychology Department), and departmental approval of student application.

390 Independent Study. F, I, and S. Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair.

399 Psychology and Religion (3 hours). F and S. This capstone course examines relationships between psychology and religion. It includes discussions of how several major psychologists have attempted to explain religious faith and practice. The course examines frameworks that have been proposed for relating Christian beliefs about persons and psychological explanations. Consideration is given to how these frameworks have influenced recent investigations of areas related to our experiences of Christian faith (e.g., perception, moral development, and emotion). Prerequisites: Psychology 151 and three additional psychology courses or permission of the instructor. (See description of Templeton Award linked to the course under “Financial Information, Other Student Awards” heading of the catalog).

Course Level: 100 | 200 | 300