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Physics & Astronomy Department

Astr111 Photography Projects, Spring 2007

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M94 Spiral Galaxy (NGC4736), Reid Coe

M 94

Galaxy M94 is located in the Canes Venatici, classified as a spiral galaxy. surrounded by a cloud of forming stars, this galaxy has been a marvel of astronomers since the late 18th century. The baffling matter is the large span of the cloud that some think was a giant explosion that happened 10 million years ago which most likely started the collapsing of gasses ergo formation of stars. The galaxy is approximated to be about 14-15 million light years away with a span of over an approximate 61,000 light years across. M94 was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1781.

M94, because it is made up of newly forming stars in the center, has an extremely bright center. with trailing arm like clouds in a counter clockwise motion. the actual cloud formation from end to end stretches a large distance compared to how far away it actually is. It reminds me of the sun in color a bright white/yellow center with a more orange outer edge.

References:
Arnette, Bill. "Messier Object M94 ". G. De Vaucouleurs, 1975. Nearby Groups of Galaxies, ch. 4, The Local Group. Published in "Galaxies and the Universe," ed. by A. Sandage, M. Sandage and J. Kristian.<http://seds.lpl.arizona.edu/messier/m/m094.html>.

Right Ascension (J2000) 12:50:54:00
Declination (J2000) 41:07:00.0
Filters used Red, Blue, Green, Clear
Exposure time per filter 300 (sec)
Date observed

March 3rd, 2004 (BVRC)