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Wildrik Botjes Planetarium
Physics & Astronomy Department

Astr110 Photography Projects, Spring 2008

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Spiral Galaxy (MCG-1-33-1), Joe Barber

Helix Nebula

A spiral galaxy consists of a ellipsoidal bulging center with two or more arms that spin out from that. There are several different kinds of spiral galaxies some with large bulges and small arms, some with small bulges and long arms. The majority of a spiral galaxy's stars are in the bulge. These stars are also the older stars of the galaxy, while conversely the younger stars spread out through the galaxy's spiraling arms along with interstellar gas and dust. Our galaxy (The Milky Way) is also a spiral galaxy.

This particular spiral galaxy carries an interesting story to be told. When being analyzed it was discovered that there is a second object almost exactly in the line of sight of this galaxy.This mysterious object was found to be a non stellar object (GSC 4955:862). No further information could be found about this object. The brightest region of this spiral galaxy's size is 1.28 arc minutes corresponding to a linear size of 20,000 light years and the distance from here to this galaxy is roughly 55 million light years.


References:

Atlas of the Universe

The Sky Computer program

Right Ascension (J2000) 12:44:03
Declination (J2000) -05:40:39
Filters used clear(C)
Exposure time per filter 10 seconds
Date observed

April 2, 2009(C)