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Majors and Minors: Pre-2011 Courses

Pre-2011 English Courses

English 100: Enhanced Written Rhetoric (3 hours). F. The first part of a year-long enhanced course sequence in Written Rhetoric. See the complete sequence description under English 102. Enrollment is by special arrangement with Student Academic Services and the English Department.

English 101: Written Rhetoric (3 hours). F and S. Students write several expository essays in which they practice rhetorical strategies, research-based argumentation, and methods of composing effective prose. In the process, students consider language as a means of discovering truth about God, the world, and themselves, and they explore its potential to communicate truth and, thereby, to transform culture.

English 102: Enhanced Written Rhetoric II (3 hours). S. In this year-long, enhanced course sequence, students write expository essays, practicing methods of composing effective prose, applying various rhetorical strategies, learning how to conduct academic research, producing research-based argumentation, and developing grammatical and syntactic proficiency in the context of their own prose. In the process, students consider language as a means of discovering truth about God, the world, and themselves, and they explore its potential to communicate truth and, thereby, to transform culture. Prerequisite: English 100.

Course Level: 100 | 200 | 300 | graduate

English 201: Academic and Professional Writing (3 hours). S. A second course in rhetoric and composition, designed for students who wish additional study of academic writing practices. Includes reading, a review of basic principles of rhetoric, and extensive practice in writing a variety of short papers in a variety of academic traditions.

English 205: Understanding Literature (3 hours). F and S, core. A study of selected literary works with an emphasis on the fundamental elements of literature and methods of reading. Discussion topics include the genres of literature and their conventions, the tools authors use to create meaning and effect, the ways readers can interpret and respond to texts, and the roles of imaginative literature in shaping and reflecting culture. An abiding concern will be how Christians might take a distinctive approach to this area of human culture.

English 210: World Literature I (3 hours). F and S. A course of selected readings and lectures in the literature of the world from the ancient world through the Renaissance, with emphasis on the Western tradition.Additional attention will be given to the literatures of non-Western cultures, such as those of Asia, Latin America, and Africa.

English 211: World Literature II (3 hours). F and S. A course of selected readings and lectures in the literature of the world from the Renaissance to the present, with emphasis on the Western tradition. Additional attention will be given to the literatures of non-Western cultures, such as those of Asia, Latin America, and Africa.

English 215: Survey of British Literature I (3 hours). F and S. A survey of major works of British literature from its beginnings to the late eighteenth century.

English 216: Survey of British Literature II (3 hours). F and S. A survey of major works of British literature from the late eighteenth century into the twentieth century.

English 217: Survey of American Literature I (3 hours). F and S. A chronological study of representative works of the American literary landscape with special attention to various movements from colonial literature through Realism.

English 218: Survey of American Literature II (3 hours). F and S. A chronological survey of representative works of the American literary landscape with special attention to various movements from Naturalism to Modernism.

English 219: Survey of Canadian Literature (3 hours). A survey of major works in Canadian literature from the 19th and 20th centuries. Readings include fiction, poetry, and drama, with an emphasis on English Canadian writers. Some attention is given to French Canadian and Native Canadian writers in translation.

English 245: Basic Journalism (3 hours). F. A study of the principles and techniques of journalism--especially newspaper journalism--specifically, the definition of news and the varying policies governing the selection and presentation of local, national, and international stories. Against the background of a critical appraisal of current practices, students write, edit, and evaluate news reports and feature stories. 

English 248: Writing for the Media (3 hours). F. An introduction to the content, styles, and formats of media scripts. The course emphasizes the differences in media writing compared with more familiar forms of writing, the role of the script as text in producing media programs, the styles of writing used (journalistic, dramatic, polemical, emotive), and the technical requirements for scripts used to focus the work of directors, actors, camera and sound technicians, editors, and mixers in creating a media product. Prerequisite: English 101. Cross-listed with CAS 248.

English 262: Business Writing (3 hours). A course introducing students to the kinds of writing and computer presentations that are required in business-related fields. Students collect examples of and practice composing the types of professional communication that they are likely to craft on the job. The class is conducted as a workshop; students consult with each other and with the instructor. Each student submits several projects. The class also includes a group report (with written, multi-media, and oral portions), in- class writing and computer exercises, and the use of word-processing and presentation software. Prerequisite: Completion of English 101 with a grade of C+ or above.

English 265: Feature Journalism (3 hours). S. A course in the art of writing feature stories. The course pays particular attention to the process by which specialized information from various fields--government, science, engineering, medicine, law, religion, and business--is prepared for public comprehension. English 245 is recommended but not required as a prerequisite.

English 275: The Craft of Writing (3 hours). S. A course in the foundational principles and practices of writing. Students compose in a variety of written genres, exploring composition from two perspectives--how texts are constructed and what they accomplish. From these two perpectives, students will consider the two classical categories of written genres: Poetics (the study of belletristic writing) and rhetoric (the study of persuasive writing). This ia a foundational course for students who are interested in advanced study of writing. Prerequisite: English 101 or instructor's approval.

English 283: African-American Literature (3 hours). A chronological survey of major writers and works of African-American literature. Readings will include fiction, poetry, and drama, with special attention paid to historic and cultural contexts.

English 285: Russian Literature (3 hours). A study of major Russian writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Authors to be read include, but are not limited to, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Bulgakov, Akhmatova, and Solzhenitsyn. Special attention will be paid to spiritual and moral issues, which are of central importance in the Russian literary tradition.

English 290: Literature and Women (3 hours). Readings will emphasize poems, stories, plays, essays, and literary criticism written by women; these readings will include both the established (e.g., Jane Austen, Emily Dickinson, Edith Wharton, Charlotte Bronte) and the recovered (e.g., Anne Lock, Aphra Behn, Charlotte Smith, Zora Neale Hurston). In addition to focusing on the many contributions made by women to literary culture, this course will examine male and female representations of the feminine experience as well as the issue of gender and its implications for literature.

English 295: Special Topics in Literature (3 hours). A special topics course in various topics.

English 296: Cinema as a Narrative Art. (3 hours). In-depth examination of the art of narrative film, focusing on one or more directors, genres, or styles of filmmaking. The course pays particular attention to narration and narrative structure, characterization, conflict, setting, and point of view and also acquaints students with literary adaptation and with the contribution of film image and sound to narrative development. The course emphasizes the development of student skills in writing about film. Also listed as CAS 296.

Course Level: 100 | 200 | 300 | graduate

English 301: Creative Nonfiction (3 hours). A course in advanced expository writing. Readings in the formal essay, together with writing in such types of composition as the formal and informal essay, the opinion editorial, the informative and feature article, and the book review. Prerequisite: English 101.

English 302: British Literature of the Middle Ages (3 hours). F. This course examines the ways in which the literature of the Anglo-Saxon and Middle English periods both reflect and influence the culture out of which they emerge. In studying an age in which art, philosophy, history, architecture, bookmaking, and social and language issues converge in the literature in strikingly uniform ways, students will understand the engagement of many cultural forces and the effect of that engagement upon a culture's expression.

English 304: British Literature of the Sixteenth Century (3 hours). A study of the poetry and of some prose of the sixteenth century and of the drama of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries.

English 305: British Literature of the Seventeenth Century (3 hours). A study of poetry and prose in England from 1600 to 1660, with emphasis on the religious lyric, especially the poetry of Donne and Herbert.  

English 307: British Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3 hours). A study of writing and its cultural contexts, with detailed attention to the works of Dryden, Swift, Addison, Pope, Johnson, and Boswell. 

English 308: British Literature of the Early Nineteenth Century (3 hours). A study of the Romantic writers of England in both poetry and prose, with intensive study of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats.

English 309: British Literature of the Middle and Later Nineteenth Century (3 hours). A study of the Victorian writers of England in both poetry and prose, including intensive study of Tennyson, the Brownings, and Arnold among the poets, and Arnold, Newman, Carlyle, Huxley, and Ruskin among the prose writers.

English 310: Literature of the United States I: Settlement to Civil War (3 hours). A close examination of the fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose of the United States prior to the Civil War. Special attention is given to major figures and cultural issues within the diverse literary landscape of America. Representative writers include Bradstreet, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, and Thoreau.

English 311: Literature of the United States II: Civil War to the Great Depression (3 hours). A close examination of the fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose of the United States from the Civil War to the Great Depression. Special attention is given to selected figures and cultural issues within the diverse literary landscape of America. Representative writers include Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Howells, James, Wharton, Cather, Fitzgerald, Robinson, Frost, and Eliot.

English 312: Literature of the United States III: World War II to Present (3 hours). A close examination of the fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose of the United States from World War II to the present. Special attention is given to selected figures and cultural issues within the diverse literary landscape of America. Representative writers include Faulkner, O'Connor, Welty, Ellison, Roethke, Bellow, Baldwin, and Updike.

English 314: The British Novel (3 hours). A study of the British novel from its origins through its proliferation of experimental forms in the early twentieth century. The course emphasizes the art and thought of the major novelists, the growth of major strains such as epic, romantic, realistic, and symbolic fiction, and the history of ideas that influenced the growth of novelistic fiction.

English 315: The American Novel (3 hours). S. A chronological study of the major novels of the American literary tradition, with reference to the historical and cultural frame in which each work rests.

English 318: Non-Western Literature: Africa or South Asia (3 hours). A historical survey of significant literary works from a non-western region of the world. The focus othe course will alternate between the literature of Africa and South Asia.

English 320: Modern British and American Poetry (3 hours). Intensive reading of selected works of major twentieth-century British and American poets. 

English 321: British and Commonwealth Literature of the Twentieth Century (3 hours). The readings include fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction prose of twentieth- century British literature. Special attention is given to the emergence of high Modernism in the 1920s and 1930s as well as its eventual permutation into Post-Modernism and to the effects of the two World Wars and the demise of the British Empire on the development of the literary tradition. Selected writers include James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, W.B. Yeats, Dylan Thomas, George Orwell, Doris Lessing, Graham Greene, V. S. Naipaul, and Derek Walcott.

English 322: Modern Drama (3 hours). A study of major British, American, and Continental playwrights of the twentieth century. Playwrights to be read may include, but are not limited to, Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Pirandello, Brecht, Williams, Miller, O'Neill, Beckett, Pinter, Shaffer, Fugard, and Norman. Emphasis is placed on the significant movements in modern drama and questions of gender-based criticism.

English 325: Children's Literature (3 hours). A study of children's literature, including intensive reading of the best of this literature and the application of literary standards to what is read.

English 326: Adolescent Literature (3 hours). A study and critical evaluation of the nature and content of adolescent literature, including intensive reading, application of literary standards, and discussion of issues in the field of young adult literature: censorship, selection criteria, reader- response theories, ethnicity, and gender-based criticism.

English 328: Recent Literature for Children (3 hours). A survey and evaluation of children's and young adult literature, with emphasis on the more recent literature; consideration of criteria for selecting such literature in the classroom; examination of reference tools, recent and historical trends, issues and approaches to understanding children's and young adult literature; and study of several representative works. Prerequisite: English 325 or 326.

English 334: Linguistics (3 hours). A study of some of the more interesting and important characteristics of language, with particular attention given to processes of language acquisition; to patterns and effects of linguistic change through time; to variations in language from region to region, social class to social class, and gender to gender; and to the assumptions informing the nomenclature, methodology, and scope of traditional, structural, transformational, generative-semantic, and text grammars. The course incidentally considers the relationship of these grammars to the study of reading and composition.

English 335: Sociolinguistics and Issues in Language Education (3 hours). This course involves two major activities: (1) an examination of selected topics that have arisen in recent sociolinguistic research, particularly those topics centering on questions about how standard and nonstandard languages and dialects appear to affect people's educational success; and (2) an evaluation of how these topics should affect approaches to language education, particularly approaches to teaching English as a Second Language (ESL). Prerequisite: English 101.

English 337: History of the English Language (3 hours). An analysis of the changes that have occurred throughout the history of the English language, based on an intensive study of selected portions of the Oxford English Dictionary and passages from Chaucer, Shakespeare, and various English translations of the Bible.

English 338: Grammar for Teachers of ESL (3 hours). In this course, students will review the fundamentals of English grammar, learn of the possiblities and limitations of teaching grammar in the ESL classroom, and research or practice the teaching of some of this grammatical material, so that they can make the most of that part of the ESL curriculum typically dedicated to the teaching of grammar. Prerequisite: English 101.

English 339: English Grammar (3 hours). Interim. A study of traditional grammar, focusing on its history, its system, its applications, its competitors, and its place in the middle school and high school classroom; special emphasis will be given to the system and terminology of this grammar.

English 345: Chaucer (3 hours). A study of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and selections from his minor work which reflect his handling of the major cultural and religious events and issues of his time. Supplementary study of other works and literary movements related to the period are included.

English 346: Shakespeare (3 hours). F and S. A study of the major works of William Shakespeare.

English 347: Milton (3 hours). A study of the poetry and prose of John Milton.

English 350: Major Authors (3 hours). A course focusing on the major and minor works of a single author by examining that author's writings in their historical, cultural, and religious contexts; every other year, the department will select a major author to be studied in this course.

English 355: Creative Writing (3 hours). A course in the principles of the practice of fiction or poetry, with emphasis to be announced prior to registration each time the course i s offered. Students will examine a variety of models and engage in extensive practice. Special emphasis will be given to the relationship of faith and art for the writer. Students may take both the fiction and the poetry version of the course for credit.

English 356: Language, Grammar, and Writing for the Elementary Classroom (3 hours). An introduction to several significant and practical aspects of the nature of language, a review of the nature of traditional grammar, including some comparisons of traditional grammar with more recently developed grammars, and exploration of the relationships between these grammars and composition instruction and practice.

English 357: Teaching of Writing (3 hours). Fall. A course in the principles, practice, and pedagogy of composition, especially as these apply to middle and high school writing programs. Extensive reading and frequent exercises in composition, revision, and evaluation. Majors in secondary education programs must take this course in the fall semester of their final year.

English 359: Seminar in Principles of and Practices in Secondary English Teaching (3 hours). Spring. A course in perspectives on, principles of, and practices in the teaching of English on the secondary level. This course should be taken concurrently with Education 346: Directed Teaching. Before taking English 359, students must pass the English Department Screening Exam and complete English 357 and Education 302/303. Before taking English 359, students normally also complete Education 307, and Education 308.

English 370: Literary Theory and Criticism (3 hours). An introduction to contemporary theories and methodologies of literary criticism with investigations into their historical origins and development. The course includes illustrations of the various methods as well as some practical criticism. 

English 380: Internship in Journalism and Publishing (3 hours). A practicum permitting students to apply theoretical, technical, and ethical principles to specific journalistic activities. Students may be placed with the publishers of magazines or newspapers, publishing houses, or other businesses. Each student works ten hours per week under an agency supervisor and participates in seminars on campus. Prerequisites: junior or senior status, a 2.5 college G.P.A., an average grade of 2.5 or higher in advanced writing courses taken (English 245, 265, 300, 355), and permission of the English Department internship supervisor.

English 390: Independent Study (3 hours). Fall, Interim, Spring. Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair.

English 395: Senior Seminar (3 hours). Fall and Spring. The capstone course in the English departmental major, designed to nurture Christian thinking about literature, literary study, language, and contemporary culture.

English 399: Honors Thesis (3 hours). A substantial work of research and criticism in the field of language or literature; required for those graduating with English Department Honors.

Course Level: 100 | 200 | 300 | graduate

English 510: Literature for the Adolescent (3 hours). A survey and evaluation of adolescent literature, an examination of reference tools and approaches to the teaching of adolescent literature, a consideration of criteria for selection, and a critical study of several representative works.

English 511: Studies in Analytical Approaches to the Teaching of Literature (3 hours). An examination of the theoretical considerations underlying various approaches to teaching literature at the secondary level and application of critical approaches to selected literary works. The specific subject matter will be defined each time the course is offered.

English 531: Language and the Elementary Classroom (3 hours). A study of some aspects of traditional grammar, an introduction to the history of the English language, and an examination of current linguistic theory and concerns. Special emphasis is placed on the implications of this knowledge for classroom teaching.

English 537: Teaching of Writing in Elementary and Middle Schools (3 hours). A course in the principles and practice of writing, including the study of techniques appropriate for teaching elementary and middle school students to write well.

English 580: Principles, Practices, and Programs in Secondary English Education (3 hours). An advanced methods course for those teachers working at the middle school or high school level, involving general principles, materials, and pedagogical practices with emphasis on current trends. Each student will make a special study of a given area of language, composition, or literature.

English 581: Methods and Materials in the Language Arts (3 hours). A study of programs and techniques of effective teaching of language arts in the elementary school and a review of current materials in relationship to improvement of instruction.

English 590: Independent Study.