German Propaganda Archive Calvin College

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Background: This is the second part of a pamphlet outlining the educational plan of the Hitler Youth organization for girls for the winter of 1938/39. Background information is available on the previous page.

The source: Dienstvorschrift der Hitler Jugend: Die weltanschauliche Schulung im Winterhalbjahr 1938/39 (Gültig für die Zeit vom 1.10.1938 bis 31.5.1939) (Berlin: Reichsjugendführung, Amt für weltanschauliche Schulung, 1938).


Worldview Education for Winter 1938/39

(Part II)


IV. Leadership Training Schools

The Reich Leadership Schools of the BDM provide three-week courses for the top leadership of the BDM. The Reich Leadership School Potsdam (I) trains senior leaders of the Madel- and Jungmädeluntergaue, and department heads in the Obergaue. The Reich Leadership School Boyden (II) trains younger leaders of the Mädel-and Jungmädeluntergaue, as well as applicants for these positions.

The Obergau Leadership Schools offer alternating three-week courses for leaders of Mädel- and Jungmädel rings and groups, and two-week courses for leaders of Mädel and Jungmädel rings and groups.

Worldview education in the Obergau Leadership Schools will follow a plan issued by the Amt WS [Office for Worldview Education].

Students of housekeeping will take courses that meet for four hours weekly for a year at the Housekeeping Schools of the BDM. This will follow a plan for worldview education issued by the Amt WS. The plan includes these areas:

  • Racial instruction
  • History
  • The National Socialist movement
  • Border and foreign Germandom

V. Leadership Training Program

Length of Leadership Training Program

The leadership training program begins on 1 October each year, and concludes on 31 March.

The Abteilungsleiterin

The WS department leaders of the Gebiet and the Obergau together plan the whole leadership training program, and determine the activities of the Bannen, Jungbannen, Untergauen, and JM-Untergauen. They choose the working group leaders, visit the working groups, and supervise them. If a group fails to meet the tasks, they intervene. They are responsible for preparing propaganda, and are responsible for gathering statistics on the leadership training program, and for maintaining a card file of group leaders. They keep in contact with the relevant Gau offices. Each WS department leader leads a local history group in the district. The department leader should use every opportunity to support the offices of the leadership training program.

The Stellenleiter

WS-Stellenleiter have the same duties in the Bann, Jungbann, Untergau, or JM-Untergau as the WS WS-Abteilungsleiter have in a Gebiet or Obergau.

The Head of the Leadership Training Program

The head of the leadership training program is also the Standortführer. The Standortführer appoints a deputy. He works closely with the relevant BDM leaders. He opens and concludes the leadership training program. The Standortführer or BDM leader chose participants and are together responsible to see that the leaders have the necessary time to visit the groups.

The Deputy of the Standortführer for the leadership training program is responsible for the necessary technical preparations, such as securing rooms, teaching materials, etc., and is also responsible for establishing reporting stations, for issuing participant ID cards, etc. In larger areas, he can have an assistant to take on some of the duties.

The themes for the groups are determined by the Reichsjugendführung, and are as follows:

Racial and ethnic policies

I. The first task of the National Socialist state is to maintain its essence. Elements:

  1. The foundation of the National Socialist worldview is racial thinking.
  2. From our knowledge of genetic laws, these principles follow:
    • Maintaining the purity of blood
    • Maintaining the health of blood
    • Expanding the blood.

German Builds

II. The German people fight for work, food, and its future. Elements:

  1. The political necessity of economic freedom.
  2. The first Four Year Plan
  3. The second four year plan.

III. People, movement and state build the Third Reich. Elements:

  1. The people is the center of Germany policy.
  2. The movement bears the will of the people.
  3. The state serves the people

The work of HJ and BDM leaders

IV. Youth in the legal system. Elements:

  1. Foundations of National Socialist law.
  2. Youth in the legal system (youth labor laws, laws on caring for the youth, the penal code for the youth).
  3. The relationship of HJ leaders with offices and agencies.

V. The duties of HJ leaders

  1. Purpose and tasks of education.
  2. National Socialist educational policies.
  3. The physical and intellectual characteristics of youth.
  4. Educational opportunities within the HJ.

Early and modern history.

VI. The Germans: Barbarians or bearers of culture? Elements:

  1. The German in the light of historical research.
  2. The lie about barbarism -- a method of political conflict.
  3. Research into early Germanic history.
  4. Early history, a living science.

VII. Our area and the growth of the Reich. Elements:

  1. Land acquisition by Nordic and German people.
  2. The fate of the area during periods of migration.
  3. How our home area joined the Reich.
  4. How our home area suffered for the Reich.
  5. What our home area contributed to the Reich.
  6. What our home area contributes to the Reich today.

VIII. The East, where Germany’s fate lies. Elements:

  1. First settlements by Nordic people.
  2. Further Germanic settlements.
  3. Germanic emigration, leaving the area empty, and the arrival of the Slavs.
  4. First campaigns against the Slavs by Charlemagne.
  5. Heinrich I and Otto I.
  6. Henry II and Konrad II.
  7. Lothar von Supplinburg.
  8. Henry the Lion.
  9. The German knightly orders and the Hanseatic Order.

IX. German sacrifices for the idea of the Reich. Elements:

  1. The Merovingian Kingdom.
  2. The Carolingian Kingdom.
  3. The people’s king Heinrich I.
  4. The Imperial Idea of Otto I during the Middle Ages.
  5. Kaiser vs. pope
  6. The great Staufen Kaiser
  7. The collapse of the Reich into dukedoms and principalities.
  8. Ulrich von Hutten’s idea of the Reich, and the Peasants’ Articles.
  9. Bernhard von Weimar and Wallenstein on the idea of the Reich.
  10. Prussia as bearer of the new German Reich, independent of Rome.
  11. The Wars of Liberation.
  12. The Second Reich.
  13. Adolf Hitler’s Third Reich

X. The people rise up against Rome. Elements:

  1. Rome’s invasion of France.
  2. Pippin’s Donation.
  3. Charlemagne and Widukind.
  4. The German people’s Kaiser, the representative of Germandom in conflict with the pope.
  5. Meister Ekkard and mysticism.
  6. German heresies in the Middle Ages.
  7. The age of discovery and the Renaissance
  8. The Reformation
  9. The North speaks (Copernicus, Keppler, etc.).
  10. The Thirty Years War.
  11. Prussia’s constant protest against Rome.
  12. The battle against the Center and K.A. from Windthorst to Faulhaber.

XI. The soldier: Germany’s eternal strength. Elements:

  1. The Nordic warrior-farmer fights for and gains his land.
  2. Migration, the Germanic Reich in the South.
  3. The rise of the knights, separation of the warrior from the farmer.
  4. Independent soldiers. The Crusades, etc.
  5. The German knightly orders.
  6. German peasants everywhere in the world.
  7. The Prussian soldier as a community ideal.
  8. German soldiers in the World War.
  9. The soldier as idea in the Third Reich.

XII. 2000 years of German defense against Asia. Elements:

  1. The assault of Asia in Antiquity.
  2. Germans — Huns
  3. Germans — Arabs.
  4. German Reich -- the Mongol attack
  5. The Turkish wars.
  6. The Russian vampire during the World War.
  7. Germany and Bolshevism.

Political Views of the World

XIII. World politics under new conditions. Elements:

  1. Bohemia, Europe’s Citadel.
  2. The Czechs as the Soviet Union’s aircraft carrier.
  3. The Soviet star in the Mediterranean.
  4. Japan’s battle for its position in East Asia.

XIV. Moscow threatens world peace. Elements

  1. Jewish world domination and Bolshevism.
  2. The Komintern, Moscow’s tool.
  3. Moscow’s hand in Central Europe and the Balkans.
  4. The Bolshevist torch in Spain.
  5. Bolshevist subversion in China.

XV. National Socialist foreign policy and Europe’s great powers. Elements

  1. The shameful Treaty of Versailles
  2. Western democracies and authoritarian states.
  3. German as the bulwark against world revolution.
  4. The political axis as an element of peace in Europe.

XVI. Fourteen states surround the Reich. Elements:

  1. The borders of Versailles.
  2. Germans fight for their rights.
  3. Common economic interests as the foundation for relations between states.
  4. Two-party pacts or collective security.

XVII. The balance of power along the Danube. Elements:

  1. The collapse of the Danube monarchy.
  2. The new order in the Danube region.
  3. Economic relations between the Reich and the Danube region.
  4. The Anschluß and its impact.

XVIII. Struggle and the significance of raw materials. Elements:

  1. The significance of raw materials in the economies of the peoples.
  2. The control of world powers of the world’s war materials.
  3. Germany and the question of raw materials.
  4. Germany’s struggle for economic independence.

XIX. National Socialist foreign policy. Elements:

  1. Securing the Reich through Bismarck’s alliance policy.
  2. Foreign policy in the Wilhelmine Era and its results.
  3. The fulfillment policies of the Weimar Republic.
  4. Foundations of National Socialist foreign policy, and its realization.

XX. Peoples battle for their living space. Elements:

  1. On living space and peoples.
  2. Italy and its empire.
  3. Japan’s battle in China.
  4. Our demand for colonies.

XXI. Will England remain a world power? Elements:

  1. The growth of the Empire.
  2. Youth education as a factor in English policy.
  3. Defending the world empire.
  4. Counterforces at work.

XXII. The critical Mediterranean Sea. Elements:

  1. Italy’s “Mare nostro.”
  2. England’s shortest sea route to India.
  3. France and its colonies in North Africa.
  4. The new Turkey and the question of the Dardanelle.
  5. The battle in Spain.

XXIII. The Jewish Question as a problem in world politics. Elements:

  1. Jews in the world.
  2. Political and economic goals and methods of World Jewry.
  3. Capitalism, Marxism, and Freemasonry and tools of the “Chosen People.”
  4. Attitudes toward Jews by the peoples.
  5. The Jewish International and National Socialist Germany.

XXIV. The world in arms. Elements:

  1. The end of the war and Wilson’s Fourteen Points.
  2. The dictate of Versailles and the collapse of the ideology of the League of Nations.
  3. The armaments of the great powers and their military training of the youth.
  4. Failed attempts at limiting armaments.
  5. Germany helps itself and re-arms.

XXV. Japan’s struggle to assert itself in the world. Elements:

  1. Japan’s rise to a world power.
  2. Spheres of interest in East Asia.
  3. The Anti-Komintern Pact and its opponents.
  4. China as the stage of world tensions

If a department leader wishes to cover a theme other than the ones discussed here, it requires the approval of the Amt WS of the Reichsjugendführung. The Amt WS head will provide themes for the program of the girls section of the BDM Chief Expert in the Amt WS of the Reichsjugendführung.

The leader of a unit must be well prepared and absolutely reliable from a worldview standpoint. The unit leaders can be taken from the following organizations:

  • The Hitler Youth
  • The Racial Policy Office
  • NSLB
  • NSKB
  • NS Physicians’ Association
  • NS Teachers’ Association
  • NS Student Association
  • SA and SS
  • German Labor Front
  • The Federation for the German East
  • The National Federation for Early German History
  • County Education Office
  • County Propaganda Office
  • County Economic Advisor
  • County Farming Organization
  • The Gau Organization for Geopolitics
  • The Gau Organization for German Ethnicity

Unit leaders will be proposed by the Bannführer, Untergauführer, or Amt WS, and approved by the Amt WS head. As much as is possible, unit leaders should attend a short conference that will give those not involved with the HJ an overview of our activity and bring them in contact with the leaders.

Meeting Rooms

It is preferable for all groups in an area to meet in the same building. The rooms may not be so close together than they interfere with each other. They should not be too large. There should be an electrical outlet for projectors and a place to hang maps and pictures. Rooms may be found in:

  • HJ buildings
  • Offices
  • City Hall rooms
  • Schools
  • High schools and trade schools
  • Scientific establishments

The Standortführer’s deputy or office manager will secure the rooms. There should be one large room where all the units can come together at the beginning and end of the leadership training program.

Teaching Materials

Books, pictures and maps cam be used as teaching materials. Books can be secured from the following places:

  • The Bann library
  • Public libraries
  • Party libraries
  • State libraries
  • University libraries
  • Teachers’ libraries
  • Factory libraries

In some cases, participants may help in building a collection of newspaper and magazine articles.

Maps can be gotten from the Reichsjugendführung, from schools, universities, and the German Foreign Institute. There is also the option of having participants prepare simple, poster-sized maps.

The HJ and SS produce film strips. Usually, a HJ film strip projector can be used. Film strip projectors can also be borrowed from:

  • County picture offices
  • Schools and universities
  • SS Sturmbanne

To help cover costs, participants in the leadership training program can be charged 1 RM.

Opening and Closing the Leadership Training Program

The Amt WS head determines the nature of the opening of the leadership training program. The opening event should occur before the units begin their meetings.

More effort should be put into the opening event than to the closing. In closing, there should simply be a gathering at with the Standortführer gives a brief speech and hands out certificates to participants. The Standortführer will also thank the volunteer unit leaders.

At all leadership meetings before opening the winter activity, the leadership training program should be mentioned. In Gebiet and Obergau newsletters, as well as in memos to leaders, an outline of the units planned for the Gebiet or Obergau should be carried. In cooperation with the press department leader, newspapers in the Gebiet and the Gau press service should regularly report on the leadership training program.

Participant requirements

Participation in the leadership training program is voluntary. Those eligible to participate include Stammführer, Jungstammführer, BDM- and JM Ringführerinnen, Fähnleinführer, BDM- and JM-Gruppenführerinnen, and members of the staffs of Banne, Jungbanne, and BDM- and JM-Untergaue. Furthermore, capable leaders of lower-level units may participate if they are at least sixteen years old. A successful applicant may count participation in the leadership training program as HJ duty.

Each working group will include about twenty leaders. The starting time depends on local conditions, but should not be later than 8:30 p.m. The starting time must be clear so that participants can arrive punctually.

A list will be kept of participants, maintained by an assigned participant. This participant will also introduce the speaker.

University for Politics

In Gebiet Berlin, the leadership training program of the Hitler Youth works together with the seminar for Hitler Youth Leaders of the German University for Politics.

The German University for Politics will announce its winter schedule in its catalog for 1938/39.

VI. Local History Training

The Amt WS heads can provide material on local history for the third home evening each month. They will provide the appropriate information.

VII. Supervising Home Evenings

For the educational year 1938/39, supervision of home evenings will follow the procedures laid out last year in Reichsbefehl 34/II of the Stabsführer.

The following directives apply this year:

The WS-Stellenleiterin as well as the BDM and JM Ringführerin should each supervise one home evening each week. The WS-Stellenleiterin will submit a monthly report to the WS-Abteilungsleiterin on the conduct of home evening supervision in the Bereich or Untergau. The WS-Abteilungsleiterin will provide a comprehensive monthly report on home evening supervision to the Amt WS. This report should be two typed pages long and is due on the 10th of the following month at the Amt WS of the Reichsjugendführung. The Obergauen may use forms.

VIII. Distribution of the home evening newsletters Die Jungmädelschaft and Die Mädelschaft.

Besides the free copies of the home evening newsletters to the units, the home evening newsletters are available by subscription at RM .45 quarterly. This price applies only to orders of at least 40 copies. Editions A and B, however, can count together (e.g., 25 copies of Jungmädelschaft, Edition A, and 15 copies of Edition B, together 40 copies).

Individual subscriptions may be taken at post offices. Orders can be made at the relevant post office branch. The quarterly price is RM .92, and RM .10 for postage.

IX: The Book Service of the Amt WS

Each month. the Amt WS of the Reichsjugendführung will select a book relevant to the educational work of the Hitler Youth that will be sent to the units down to the Bann level (Jungbann, Untergau), as approved by the Reichskassenverwalter. All other lower-level units will have opportunity to order these books as well, depending on their financial abilities. The Bücherwerk GmbH, Berlin W9, Potsdamer Straße 18, will handle this. Each month, a sufficient number of order slips will be distributed so that lower-level units that want the book can order the book directly from Berlin. The book will be sent COD from there.

Furthermore, each BDM leader can use this book service. For information, here is a list of some of the books previously provided:

  • Baldur von Schirach: Idee und Gestalt
  • Günter: Kleine Rassenkunde
  • Fritsche: Handbuch der Judenfrage
  • Pastenaci: Volksgesichte der Germanen
  • Strobel: Bauerbrauch im Jahreslauf
  • Adamheit: Rote Armee -- rote Weltrevolution
  • Bismarck: Gedanken und Erinnerungen
  • Rotacker: Das Dorf an der Grenze
  • Chamerlain: Goethe
  • Hölderlin: Gebot und Erfüllung
  • Brehm: Das war das Ende
  • Natori: Großes Japan
  • Colin Roß: Unser Amerika

The book for September is Stuckart-Albrecht: Neues Staatsrecht.

For October/November, the Cartographic Institute is preparing Wagner-Oebel: Handatlas für die HJ.

December: Jambrowski: Deutschland in der Weltwirtschaft.

X. The filmstrip as educational method

The HJ projector.

The HJ projector was developed by the Amt WS to allow the projected picture to become a more important tool for educational work. The Stabsleiter has ordered that each new Hitler Youth home is to have one. The HJ projector belongs in each Hitler Youth home. It is therefore necessary for each HJ leader and each Mädel leader to learn how to use this important tool, and to work with party offices and government offices to secure a projector for the formation of for the location.

The HJ projector comes complete for RM. 100 (including the projector with a 250-watt lamp, a stand, a replacement bulb, and case). Orders are to be made through the HJ administrative office, which will direct them to the dealer who can order the necessary item.

Offices and persons outside the HJ may order the HJ projector as long as they agree to make the equipment available at any time for the relevant HJ unit.

You are reminded that, by order of the Reichskassenverwalter, HJ projectors are to be inventoried and kept secure.

“Filmstrips for Education in the Hitler Youth”

“Filmstrips for Education in the Hitler Youth” should not be used as visual aids for a speech, but rather are an independent educational method.

They may be purchased for RM 1 each from the Sales Office of the Verwaltungsamt der Reichsjugendführung, payment with the order. The shipping costs depend on the number of filmstrips ordered:

    1. 1 to 3 filmstrips: RM .15
    2. 4 to 6 filmstrips: RM .20
    3. 7 to 12 filmstrips: RM .40
    4. 13 filmstrips or more: RM .50

To order ten filmstrips, for example, send 10 X RM 1 and RM .40, or a total of RM 10.40, to Postscheckkonto Berlin Nr. 11 071.

To simplify the process, each film strip has a number so that the whole title does not need to be given.

By order of the Reichspropagandaleiter of the NSDAP, “Filmstrips for Education in the Hitler Youth” may be ordered by offices and persons outside the HJ through the Gaubildstellen or the Hauptstelle Lichtbild of the Reichspropagandaleitung (Munich, Karlstraße 20).

The following filmstrips are currently available:

    • Genetically Ill Offspring (E N)
    • Healthy Family -- Healthy People (M 1)
    • Versailles and how it was Overcome (W 1)
    • The Old Army and the New Army (W 2)
    • Germany Overcomes Jewry (W 3)
    • The Organization of National Labor (W 4)
    • How Our Ancestors Lived (V 1)
    • 5000 Years of Germandon (V 2)
    • Christmas (K 1)
    • Germans beyond the Border (G 1)
    • German Achievements in the East (G 2)
    • Border Land Upper Silesia (G 5)
    • Ethnic Struggles in the East (G 3)
    • Borderland Upper Silesia (G 5)

Filmstrip Service of the Amt WS

Parallel to the Book Service, the Amt WS has established a filmstrip service to regularly supply the units with film strips. This includes all Gebiete, Obergaue, Reichs-, Gebiets-, Obergau-, and Fachschulen of the HJ, as well as all Banne, Jungbanne, Untergaue, and JM-Untergaue. Each unit can subscribe individually, or several together. Each month, two film strips will appear, for a total price of RM 2.30. Applications should be sent to the Verwaltungsstelle of the Bann (Untergau), which will distribute the filmstrips and collect the payments. Every unit that has an HJ projector should participate.

The planned filmstrips for the educational year 1938/39 are:

    • October: Living World; The Struggle of the Sudeten Germans
    • November: Healthy Life; The Movement’s Struggle
    • December: Christmas; Unity of the Reich
    • January: Growing People; Nature of the People
    • February: Working People, The Ostmark of the Reich
    • March: Land on the Border; White Gold: The Significance and Manufacture of Spinning Material
    • April: Germany Demands Colonies; Adolf Hitler
    • May: East Prussia: Bridge and Bulwark; Baltic Germans: Outposts against Asia

Ordering and Using the “Filmstrips for Education in the Hitler Youth”

The Reichspropagandaleitung der NSDAP, in agreement with the Stellvertreter des Führers and the Beauftragten für die gesamte geistige und weltanschauliche Erziehung der NSDAP, ruled on 20 May 1938 that the Reichspropagandaleitung is responsible for the entire filmstrip system of the party, its subordinates, and affiliated organizations.

The request by the Amt WS to produce and issue filmstrips for internal use in the educational work of the Hitler Youth was approved under Article 3 of the above agreement.

All filmstrips used in the education program of the Hitler Youth will carry the subtitle “Filmstrips for Education in the Hitler Youth.” Offices of the Hitler Youth that plan to produce filmstrips must inform the Amt WS before beginning work, and must submit the filmstrip before duplicating it for an evaluation of its content, methods, and technical aspects. The Amt WS will secure approval for the filmstrip in question, and will issue permission to publish it as a “Filmstrip for Education in the Hitler Youth,” and to use it in HJ educational activity. It is forbidden to use the subtitle for filmstrips that have not been submitted to the Amt WS. Filmstrips from private publishing firms may not be used in HJ educational activity without prior permission.

This regulation also applies to the production and use of slides and Epikarten.

HJ units do not need to follow the Reichspropaganaleitung’s regulation on reporting or supplying projectors and material as long as they are using the HJ projector or ““Filmstrips and Slides for Education in the Hitler Youth.” The required reporting will be handled centrally by the Amt WS, which will arrange matters with the Reichspropagandaleitung. Requests from Gau or county picture office of the NSDAP should be replied to by mentioning this regulation. In uncertain cases, consult with the Amt WS.

XI. Wille und Macht

All paid leaders of the Hitler Youth will receive the magazine Wille und Macht, issued by the Reichsjugendführer, at their own expense. Leaders of BDM and JM Ringen receive this magazine without cost. Wille und Macht appears every two weeks. Every four weeks, it includes a supplement from the Amt WS titled Weltanschaung im Kampf. Wille und Macht, along with the supplements on worldview education, are indispensable for the HJ leadership.

Appendix!

Duties of Offices with Regards to the Worldview Education Program

Duties of the JMschaftsführerin

  1. Preparing and carrying out the home evening. (Where the home evening is conducted by the JM-Scharführerin, she assists in preparing the evening).
  2. Working through the leadership training in the Jungmädelschaft.
  3. Collecting the Jungmädelschaft.
  4. Participating in weekend training.

Duties of the JM-Scharführerin

  1. Preparing and carrying out the home evening.
  2. Working through the leadership training in the Jungmädelschaft.
  3. Collecting the Jungmädelschaft.
  4. Participating in weekend training.
  5. Participating in a course at the Obergau leadership school.

Duties of the JM-Gruppenführerin

  1. Supervision of the home evening. (Each Schar should be visited at least once a month.)
  2. Providing the Scharen with additional educational material (dealing with libraries, etc.).
  3. Participating in weekend education and supporting the JM-Ringführerin.
  4. Participating in a course at the Obergau leadership school.
  5. Working through the leadership training in the Jungmädelschaft.
  6. Taking the worldview examination for the JM Achievement Badge, if the JM-Gruppenführerin has taken a course at the Obergau leadership school.
  7. Voluntary participation in leadership training program, if she is over 16 years of age.

Duties of the JM-Ringführerin

  1. Home evening supervision for each group at least once a quarter.
  2. Preparing and conducting weekend schools each fall after the appearance of the special issue of the Jungmädelschaft with Die Wochenendschulung supplement, according to the calendar established by the Untergau.
  3. Participating in a course at the Obergau leadership school.
  4. Working through Wille und Macht, including the supplement Weltanschauung im Kampf.
  5. Taking the worldview examination for the JM Achievement Badge, if she has taken a course at the Obergau leadership school.
  6. Voluntary participation in the leadership training program.

Duties of the JM-Untergauführerin

  1. Organizational leadership of home evening supervision in the Jungmädeluntergau, with the assistance of the WS-Stellenleiterin and the Jungmädelringführerin. (A list of home evening meeting places within the Untergau must always be available for inspection by superior offices.)
  2. Planning and overall leadership of weekend training in the Jungmädeluntergau. (Each year, each Untergau must hold at least four weekend training courses between 1 October and 31 May. At the beginning of each educational year (October to May), a list of dates and locations for weekend training courses should be submitted to the Jungmädelbeauftragten of the Obergau, and to the
    Abteilungsleiterin WS
    ).
  3. Knowing the worldview requirements for the Jungmädel Achievement Badge.
  4. Recruiting and training Jungmädelführerin applicants, and testing those Jungmädelführerin applicants (JMfA) who are under one of her Jungmädelring- or Jungmädelgruppenführerin.
  5. Working through the monthly book from the Amt WS.
  6. Working through Wille und Macht, including the supplement Weltanschauung im Kampf.
  7. Cooperating with the education offices of other organizations to exchange speakers, etc.
  8. Participating in a course at the Reich Leadership School.
  9. In cooperation with the Mädeluntergauführerin, planning and conducting leadership training.

Duties of the Mädelschaftsführerin

  1. Preparing and carrying out the home evening. (Where the home evening is conducted by the Scharführerin, she assists in preparing the evening).
  2. Working through the leadership training in the Mädelschaft.
  3. Collecting the Mädelschaft.
  4. Participating in weekend training.

Duties of the Mädelscharführerin

  1. Preparing and carrying out the home evening.
  2. Working through the leadership training in the Mädelschaft.
  3. Collecting the Mädelschaft.
  4. Participating in weekend training.
  5. Participating in a course at the Obergau leadership school.

Duties of the Mädelgruppenführerin

  1. Supervision of the home evening. (Each Schar should be visited at least once a month.)
  2. Providing the Scharen with additional educational material (dealing with libraries, etc.).
  3. Participating in weekend education and supporting the Ringführerin.
  4. Participating in a course at the Obergau leadership school.
  5. Working through the leadership training in the Mädelschaft.
  6. Voluntary participation in leadership training program.

Duties of the Mädelringführerin

  1. Home evening supervision for each group at least once a quarter.
  2. Preparing and conducting weekend schools each fall after the appearance of the special issue of the Jungmädelschaft with Die Wochenendschulung supplement, according to the calendar established by the Untergau.
  3. Participating in a course at the Obergau leadership school.
  4. Working through Wille und Macht, including the supplement Weltanschauung im Kampf.
  5. Voluntary participation in the leadership training program.

Duties of the WS-Stellenleiterin

  1. Regular supervision of home evenings.
  2. Technical organization of weekend training, consulting with the Mädelringführerinnen, holding training sessions and giving talks. (Each year, each Untergau must hold at least four weekend training courses between 1 October and 31 May. At the beginning of each educational year (October to May), a list of dates and locations for weekend training courses should be submitted to the Abteilungsleiterin WS of the Obergau).
  3. Participating in the leadership training program. Possibly leading a working group.
  4. Heading the educational library of the Untergau.
  5. Administering the monthly book service of the Amt WS.
  6. Working through Wille und Macht, including the supplement Weltanschauung im Kampf.
  7. Submitting reports to the Abteilungsleiter WS
    1. After the end of the winter program.
    2. After the end of the summer program
  8. Participating in the national course for WS-Stellenleiterinnen.

 

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